• JP Magazine
  • Dirt Sports + Off-Road
  • 4-Wheel & Off-Road
  • Four Wheeler

2012 Scout & Light Truck Nationals

Posted in Events on February 1, 2012 Comment (0)
Share this

For 22 years now, IH Scout and light truck buffs have had a national meet in Springfield, Ohio, the place where International Harvester once built farm equipment and where its offspring, Navistar International, still does business building trucks and engines. Springfield is also home to Super Scout Specialists, an arm of Scout/Light Line Distributors, which is the firm that bought all of IH’s remaining Scout and light truck interests and assets, including trademarks and the rights to build parts.

Somewhere along the line, this 1928 IH S-series IH truck was fitted with a corn mill for farm use that’s powered by a Ford flathead V-8. This truck won the Best Engineering award.

While any type of IH or IH-powered vehicle is welcome, each year has a theme vehicle. This time around it was the Wagonmaster and Travelette—two of IH’s four-door trucks. This time around the oldest truck was an unrestored 1926 S-24 1-ton. Predominant are the Scouts and the IH light trucks, a good many of them 4x4s. While you will find built rigs, the majority of the IH interest is restoration. Of the 150 vehicle at the show this year, most were stock or nearly stock, but there were a few notable nonstock rigs too.

Jerry Shook’s ’73 Scout II half-cab had 16,205.5 miles on it. He bought the Scout from the original owner in 2001 with 15,995 miles. Just 200 miles in 10 years. Other than the tires, battery, and muffler, it is all original and looks it. It still has some of the paper tags and crayon.

Traditionally, the Scout and Light Truck Nationals are held in early/middle September at the Clark County Fairgrounds just off Interstate 70 in Springfield and coincide with the huge Fall Cars & Parts Swap Meet and Car Show, a huge event in and of itself. Like most event stories, this one is best told in pictures.

Darrel Foster mated the front of a ’74 3⁄4-ton 1210D 4x4 with the final drive of a Minneapolis-Moline 302 tractor. The tractor hydraulics, including the three-point hit and PTO, all work, so in theory it could still be used as a tractor. The truck’s original tranny and transfer case are intact, as is the tractor’s five-speed and two-speed range box. The combination delivers a total of 36 forward and 16 reverse gears.
View Slideshow

Sources

Super Scout Specialists
http://www.superscoutspecialists.com
Midnitestar Productions
http://www.midnitestar.org

Comments

Connect With Us

Newsletter Sign Up

Subscribe to the Magazine

Sponsored Links