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Mud and More 2002, Minnesota Style

Posted in Events on May 1, 2002 Comment (0)
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For whatever reason, we see more car-bodied 4x4s in Minnesota than any other state. While they might be ugly, some of them actually work fairly well, as did this one we spotted traversing the tire pit. For whatever reason, we see more car-bodied 4x4s in Minnesota than any other state. While they might be ugly, some of them actually work fairly well, as did this one we spotted traversing the tire pit.
The long, cold winters of Minnesota give people plenty of time to fabricate the weird and the wacky. We wouldn’t even know where to begin to describe this one, except to say that it is part quad and part motorcycle, with miscellaneous four-wheel-drive parts thrown in for good measure. The long, cold winters of Minnesota give people plenty of time to fabricate the weird and the wacky. We wouldn’t even know where to begin to describe this one, except to say that it is part quad and part motorcycle, with miscellaneous four-wheel-drive parts thrown in for good measure.
On hand to pull out the stuck and stranded was a tractor that was busy for most of the day. On hand to pull out the stuck and stranded was a tractor that was busy for most of the day.
A monster truck was on hand to give rides to kids of all ages. A monster truck was on hand to give rides to kids of all ages.
Even stock vehicles can get into the action. This S-10 Blazer was seen romping through the shallower ends of the bogs, allowing its occupants to have fun all day. Even stock vehicles can get into the action. This S-10 Blazer was seen romping through the shallower ends of the bogs, allowing its occupants to have fun all day.
The more serious mud trucks seen playing in the pit were shod with giant tractor tires, had big engines, four-wheel steering, and stout axles—even such unlikely candidates as this Ford Ranger. The more serious mud trucks seen playing in the pit were shod with giant tractor tires, had big engines, four-wheel steering, and stout axles—even such unlikely candidates as this Ford Ranger.
The grease hills are super-slippery hillclimbs coated with plenty of mud, and they always draw a crowd of spectators. This big Ford made several attempts but its rear driveshaft let go before it could get to the top. The grease hills are super-slippery hillclimbs coated with plenty of mud, and they always draw a crowd of spectators. This big Ford made several attempts but its rear driveshaft let go before it could get to the top.
Playing in the mud requires the ability to keep your rig cool. If you don’t have that, your rig will start to emit enough steam and smoke to hide behind. Playing in the mud requires the ability to keep your rig cool. If you don’t have that, your rig will start to emit enough steam and smoke to hide behind.
Yes, the mud is plenty deep in Minnesota. Luckily the tow trucks are a lot bigger than average. Yes, the mud is plenty deep in Minnesota. Luckily the tow trucks are a lot bigger than average.

Mud is a polarizing substance. Folks either hate it, or they instantly become addicted to running through the biggest and deepest quagmires they can find. Luckily for those mud addicts in or near Buffalo, Minnesota, there is an event called Mud and More. Three times a year, the doctors of mud that run the event spend plenty of time mixing dirt and water to concoct the perfect blend of slop to try to stop even the heartiest of mud rigs.

Upon entering the gooey grounds of Mud and More, you instantly become a part of a festival of slime. A giant mud pit, and a smaller one, wait to sink challengers. Even a couple of slime hills are available for those who like to attack mud in a more vertical orientation. Of course there is always the fun of watching others try to wallow their way through the mess. Interested? Tentative plans for 2002 are to open the gates for mudding mayhem for the first weekend in May, the fourth weekend in June, and the third weekend in September. For further information visit www.mudandmore.com or call 763/684-1686.

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