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1976 Ford F150 and the Mud Hole - Worst Stuck Trucks

Stuck In Mud Hole
Kelly Roberts, Altoona, Wisconsin | Photographer
Posted June 1, 2001
Photographers: Jake Iannarelli, Camp Pendleton, California, Ross Signorino, Mishawaka, Indiana

Stuck Trucks

Editor's Note: Looking to get payback on your buddy? OFF-ROAD magazine would like to help. Simply send us a few photos and the details of your friend's off-road mishaps, and we'll make sure the off-roading community remembers his or her shame. Send the dirty details to: OFF-ROAD magazine, Worst Stuck, 774 S. Placentia Ave., Placentia, CA 92870.

Stuck In The Mud
A recent expedition with members of the Clearwater 4-Wheelers is the subject of this scene. It appears that Kelly Robert's friend Jamie was encouraged to drive through this mud hole, when he was told that his Ford 4x4 couldn't make it. Needless to say, they were right: His '76 Ford F-150 with 38x15.50x15 tires didn't make it. With the help of Kelly and his stock Jeep Wrangler, Jamie and his Ford were later pulled out.

Oops!
This picture comes to us from Jake Iannarelli, a heavy equipment operator and Lance Corporal in the United States Marine Corps. While in the field at Camp Pendleton with one of the SEE Tractors (Small Emplacement Excavator), he suffered this misfortune while digging some fighting positions for the grunts. Jake was climbing a hill when the four-wheel drive went out, which caused the rear tires to break loose and make the tractor go sideways. When Jake tried to straighten out the SEE by rolling downhill, the left tire went up the dirt embankment, and the vehicle nearly rolled over. Jake was lucky enough to escape with only cracked ribs and lacerations. It took Jake and three other Marines the better part of the day to recover the SEE Tractor using a bulldozer and an ACE (Armored Combat Excavator).

Training Mission
Running reconnaissance with the Three Rivers, Michigan, Army National Guard at Camp Grayling, Ross Signorino and his unit got this Hummer stuck in a mud pit. Due to the thick grass in the area, it was difficult for them to see where they were going until it was too late. With the aid of two 20,000-pound eight-wheel-drive Hemmits, they were able to pull the Hummer out and return to their mission and training exercises shortly thereafter.

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