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The Beast's Beast

Posted in Features on November 13, 2002 Comment (0)
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Contributors: Skip Baker

Throughout the world, from the beginning of time, there have always been reports of mysterious creatures lurking throughout the dark corners of the globe. The Loch ness Monster in Scottland, the Yeti of Japan ,and now The Beast of Spartanburg, South Carolina. The town of Spartanburg didn't always have The Beast, however. The newest member of the world's scariest and most intimidating entities showed up right around the same time that George Harley Jr. had saved enough money to get rid of his '79 daily driver Jeep CJ-7 and purchase a brand-new '99 Ford F-250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4. Within six months, the incubation period for his creature, The Beast, was over and the Ford was on the asphalt and moving fast. To really understand this enigma, one needs to start at the beginning and understand how the transformation began.

Upon taking delivery of his new ride, Harley drove it straight into the garage and began to disassemble the suspension. After all, if The Beast was going to divide and conquer, it better have enough wheel travel and ground clearance to do so. The first item of business in creating this cloud grabber was the installation of a complete Skyjacker suspension system. Skyjacker re-arched 6-inch springs combined with specially valved triple Skyjacker shocks up front and singles in the rear brought the truck to a respectable monster truck height. George then went over the top and installed a 3-inch Skyjacker body lift for a more pronounced stance.

Able to see much more of the drivetrain components with the added inches, George had the rear axlehousing cover of the Dana 80 replaced with a sturdier chrome-plated unit that would also serve to protect the 3.73 gears inside. Braided and colored stainless steel brake lines increase the pedal response of the factory ABS brake system. The raised front and rear suspension permitted George to mount a wheel and tire combination consisting of 16.5x15-inch Alcoa's wrapped with 38.5x18x16.5 Mickey Thompson Baja belted tires that would make anyone in the way run for cover.

With the desired stance in place, George tuned and adjusted the remaining items on his rig. More than satisfied with the 6.8L Ford V-10 Triton powerplant, George elected to leave things stock for warranty and reliability's sake. According to George, "The Beast can tow my fishing boat or work trailer as though nothing is even behind us." Well then, enough said on that subject. But then again, can any beast ever be too powerful? George did allude to us that there are some future modifications right around the corner.

As with most any creature, scary or not, a soft spot is located somewhere that not many people can see or experience. For the lucky few who get a chance to ride shotgun in The Beast, they undoubtedly find it the second the door swings open. Greeting them like an ice cold glass of water after a 50-mile hike across the Saraha Desert is the custom upholstered, smooth and soft brown leather seating. Upon getting settled in for a few miles, it doesn't take long to realize that no matter what road The Beast travels, civilization is only a few fingers away, thanks to the custom installed Galaxy CB radio and scanner that is mounted behind the rearview mirror.

When the driver and occupants want to escape from it all, George just presses the power button of the Blaupunkt CD/radio and instantly, as though the gates of heaven burst open, the Rockford Fosgate midranges, tweeters, and dual 10-inch subwoofers that have been mounted under the rear seat come to life via dual 50-watt Rockford Fosgate amplifiers. Privacy glass was installed to keep the mystery of The Beast's owner protected.

The end of The Beast's incubation period came when George began the final exterior modifications, which proved to be the defining moment of the rig's creation. George installed a Wilderness Outdoors roof rack to hold his chromed hand shovel, Hi-Lift jack, fullsize spare, tire and four high-powered 150-watt Cibie halogen off-road lights.

A stainless steel Stull grille was installed behind the chromed front bumper and Wilderness Outdoors brush guard that houses six additional PIAA off-road lights. Chromed bedrails and fender flares, black oxide nerf bars with step chains mounted on each side, and a chromed exhaust tip all add to the overall appearance of The Beast. Custom maroon and gold pinstriping and graphics compliment the stainless steel quarter panels.

Seen cruising the dirt roads of Spartanburg as well as the roads between its home and Nashville, Tennessee, with its owner/keeper, The Beast is as elusive as any other mythical creature. However, when this monster decides to go bump in the night, that usually means driving in, around, or through whatever is in its path. Which makes finding this creature very easy because all one has to do is follow the path of destruction that leads into George's garage.

0301or 01zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Front Passenger Side View Through The Mud
0301or 02zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Driver Side View Climbing Logs
0301or 03s+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Close Up Of Wheel Climbing Logs
0301or 04zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Under Side Window Beast Graphic
0301or 05zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Front View Light Bar And Grille
0301or 06zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Close Up Shocks
0301or 07s+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Rear Shot Of Rear Tires On Logs0
0301or 08zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Drive Train And Leaf Springs
0301or 09zoom+1999 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab 4x4+Roof Light Bar And Tire Rack

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