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1977 Chevy C10 - Savin' Cash, Goin' Fast

Posted in Features on November 1, 2009 Comment (0)
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Scott McCracken grew up riding and racing dirt bikes. A few years back he decided he wanted to build up a go-fast truck for fun and to try his hand at some desert competition. He put the word out that he was looking for a base truck for the project and a friend soon pointed him to a source that had what he was seeking.

Scott ended up buying basically a basket case 1977 Chevy C10 truck in 2005 that had formerly been a working prerunner but was in the middle of some suspension modifications when the previous owner decided to move on to another project. Once Scott hauled it home on a trailer, he set out by removing most of the front end of the truck and started redesigning it the way he wanted.

Where we, and probably many of you, can relate is the desire to build up a cool project and do so on a budget short of what it costs to fly to the moon. This was Scott's plan as well. To keep costs down, he had planned to do most of the work himself, including all the mechanical, chassis, fabrication, and welding. He did have a few ace cards that would make achieving his goal easier. Scott designs and builds industrial machinery, works in the metal fabrication industry and around some well-known builders. Cutting Edge Manufacturing, where he works, does all manner of CNC work, including laser cutting and forming, so he does have access to some excellent tooling to turn his metal ideas into reality.

When he started, he knew little about building a truck of this nature but did a lot of studying and asking questions to friends and fellow fabricators. Being a mechanical engineer by trade, Scott is adept at designing and modeling with Pro/ENGINEER 3D CAD software, so most everything was designed and checked on a computer screen before metal parts were cut and welded.

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This truck took a few years to build given the financial constraints and Scott doing almost all the work himself. He made a parts list of components he knew he would need and was vigilant to shop for used parts or discounts that could bring in the parts he needed while minimizing the cash that left. He advised us that patience pays and it takes time to build, so look for good deals along the way.

Scott's already tried the truck out in a couple of races, placing second in class in the Whiplash Vulture Mine race and fourth overall in the Whiplash Firebird GP. He's looking forward to doing more racing regionally and in Best in the Desert races.

With the truck up and running, and starting to compete, it looks like Scott met his goal to build a DIY capable racer on a budget within reach of many of us. Maybe you'll build one too!





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