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June 2013 4xForum

Posted in Features on May 18, 2013 Comment (0)
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Photographers: 4WDSU Staff

Q I just finished reading your March 2013 article on the Last Colorado. I really enjoyed it. I own a 2006 Chevy Colorado Z71 crew-cab 4x4 with the 3.7L I-5. I installed only two mods so far—a K&N 77 Series cold-air intake and a MagnaFlow cat-back dual exhaust system. I want to lift it up to 6 inches and run 35-inch tires. Most of the lifts I find are only 4 inches and require a 2-inch body lift to fit 35s. Do you know where I can find a 6-inch system for this truck? Also, what disadvantages should I expect in raising this model truck so high? I don’t mind cutting the body or fenders for clearance and I also plan on installing a custom front bumper. Thanks for any help you can provide.
Nathan Aubriz
San Diego, CA

A Nathan, we’re glad you enjoyed the article about the Chevy Colorado. You can look forward to seeing a lot more of Phil’s project Colorado throughout the year. CST Performance Suspension [(951) 571-0212, cstsuspension.com] makes a 5-inch kit for the Colorado/Canyon model, and additional lift can be achieved by using CST’s 1-inch rear lift shackle. The CST 5-inch system allows use of 285/70R17 or 33x12.50R17 tires on 17x8-inch wheels with 4.5 inches backspacing, so with the 1-inch lift shackle and by cranking up the torsion bars you should be able to fit 35-inch tires without carving out too much of the fenders. A lot of Colorado/Canyon owners go with a straight-axle swap up front to achieve the desired lift, but that is a much larger project than a simple bolt-on kit. I don’t expect you’ll experience many disadvantages to lifting your Colorado other than the regular issues associated with running larger-than-stock tires on any vehicle: decrease in fuel economy, increased driveline wear, and increased road noise (with aggressive tread tires), to name a few. These are minor issues, however, and can be avoided with the installation of the proper ratio ring-and-pinion gears and regular inspection and maintenance to your driveline components. Hope this helps. ’Wheel on.

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