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August 2012 Sideways Vintage Edition

Posted in Features on August 1, 2012 Comment (0)
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Got an old dusty memento of Jeep culture from the past, snapshots of granny and grandpa picnicking in the shade of their CJ-2A, or a relative in uniform with their trusty gas-horse? Scan ’em and send ’em to Sideways, Vintage Edition, christian.hazel@jpmagazine.com and we’ll be proud to share ’em.

Sidearmed
This is a picture of my dad, Al Peterson, in the winter of 1950-1951 during the Korean War. As you see in the picture, he has a revolver that my grandfather sent him through the mail, hidden in a box of oatmeal. My dad tells me that later on they were ordered to always have the front window folded down. The thinking was that it allowed you to draw your weapon faster if you came under fire. Later still, the front of the Jeeps were fitted with a vertical pole to cut wires that the enemy had strung across the roads at neck-height. Jeeping today is a little safer!
Brett Peterson
Via email

Crack-Up
Apparently my late uncle, Charles, went too far off-roading during his service in Korea. The only caption on the back of the photo reads, “This used to be my Jeep.”
Craig Smith
Russell,KY

Hands-on Christmas
This is our grandpa, Ray Bowermaster (left), tying down the family’s Christmas trees in December 1967 atop our ’56 Willys Wagon in rural northwestern California about 300 miles north of San Francisco. Our dad’s cousin, Neil, is on the right. Good times. Four-wheel drive? Check. Four-low? Check. All four wheels chained up? Check. When was the last time you could stand on the hood of a SUV?
Dan Bowermaster
Via email

Family Tradition
This is the only picture I have found of my grandfather, Luther Cocanougher, with his ’47 Willys. It was taken in 1957 while he was housing tobacco. My dad has told me that they used the Willys for all the farm work, they didn’t even have a tractor. I believe it even had a PTO, and he also did his mowing with it. He remembers having to put chains on all four tires to get to town and back, since they lived on top of a hill with a steep road up to it. From where I live, I can look off of the back deck and still see the house where he was raised. I love the story he told me about a neighbor who made fun of Papaw’s Jeep and told him to get a tractor. Papaw hooked his Willys to the neighbor’s tractor for a pull off and pulled the tractor clear out of the barn. I guess my love of Jeeps is hereditary.
Joseph Cocanougher
Gravel Switch, KY

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