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August 2012 Vintage Vault

Posted in Features on August 1, 2012 Comment (0)
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August 2012 Vintage Vault
Contributors: Thomas Voehringer

‘42 Bantam, Rubicon Edition
So we are not sure about what’s going on in this image, but hell, that’s a Bantam, and what California-based caveman would not want to club and drag off a Bantam for himself? Seriously though, in our opinion the only thing cooler than running the Rubicon trail in a flattie is running the Rubicon trail in a military flattie—and the only thing cooler than that is running the Rubicon in a pre-standardized Bantam.

Swamped Again
Run by the Jeeper’s Jamboree, these photos show a two-day northern California trek from Georgetown through the Sierras to Lake Tahoe. The adventurers overnighted at Rubicon Springs. There were reportedly 251 Jeeps and 790 participants including this guy whose early CJ-5 got stuck. Whamp whaaa! The worst part is that all that camping gear in the bed extension was swamped. We hope his bed-roll was not too wet.

Familiar Scene
Is that the squeeze right after you go past Soup Can Rock just ahead of these two flatties? If so, Little Sluice is just ahead.

Good Times, Beautiful Scenery, Great Wheeling
Git-r-done boys! Can you imagine four men wheeling and camping out of a CJ-3B for two days on the Rubicon Trail? Man they are three deep across the front seat! Check out the ammo can side step/storage box, early Warn locking-hubs, and the bent factory side step.

Rubicon Water Crossing
It’s hard to imagine a more iconic image than a Jeep on the Rubicon trail. We were very happy when we came across these pictures of vintage flatties, CJ-5s and even a Bantam or two wheeling what looked like familiar Northern California trails in the archives of Motor Trend magazine. With a little help of our archivist, Thomas Voehringer, we were able to confirm our beliefs. These photos were shot by Bob D’Olivo on a trip across the Rubicon in 1957. Here we see a CJ-2A fording a water hole somewhere on the trail.

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