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2019 SUV of the Year: Which 4x4 Wins Our On- and Off-Road Battle?

Posted in Features on January 28, 2019
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When you go to purchase a new SUV, you likely look at the price and the specifications. You might even get a short testdrive from the dealer. If you are buying an SUV you plan to take off-road though, this doesn’t cut it. That’s where we come in. For 46 years we have been testing 4x4 SUVs in extreme conditions, and the 2019 SUV of the Year (SUVOTY) competition carried on that tradition. It covered five days and consisted of approximately 1,000 miles on- and off-road. The test included steep, loose hillclimbs; sand dunes; fast two-tracks; rough dirt roads; rocky trails; water crossings; and slippery snow-covered roads and trails. We test the vehicles in almost every way imaginable and pass our impressions on to you, so you can factor the information into your buying decision. But new-vehicle shoppers aren’t the only ones who are interested in our test; the manufacturers covet our SUVOTY award and realize that it gives their vehicles huge street cred (or dirt cred, in this case). And, of course, the findings from SUVOTY are great info for those who like to keep up on what’s new in the 4x4 SUV world.

SUVOTY, formerly known as Four Wheeler of the Year, is open to all-new or substantially revised four-wheel-drive SUVs with a production run of at least 1,500 vehicles in the U.S., offering an off-road–specific equipment package or a two-speed transfer case (or equivalent) that produces low-range–type gearing. And all vehicles had to be available on dealer lots by March 15, 2019. For 2019, the lineup included the Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite, Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, Land Rover Range Rover HSE P400e, Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e, and Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro. The all-new ’19 Jeep Gladiator was also invited, but the vehicle wasn’t available at the time of our test.

The SUVOTY test took place in Southern California, and our panel of judges rotated into each SUV at regular, frequent intervals. The judges in the test were all experienced off-road drivers that have logged many hours driving in the dirt. During the test, the judges were required to record detailed notes in their official judging books, and they scored each vehicle in a variety of areas. You can read about the specific testing categories and how scoring is structured later in this story. The end game was to detect the strengths and weaknesses of each SUV. To accomplish that goal, we drove the vehicles almost nonstop for five days, stopping only to eat and sleep. We drove the vehicles in almost every imaginable on-road situation, from twisties to highways, and as previously noted we pointed ’em onto a variety of off-road terrain.

Times are changing in the SUV market. Eight cylinders and four-speed transmissions are a thing of the past. Four out of five of the 2019 SUVOTY vehicles boasted 2.0L turbocharged engines, and the average number of gears in the transmission was eight, but as you’ll soon read, those changes didn’t negatively impact on- and off-road capability.

So, what are the latest trends in 4x4 SUVs? Did every SUV survive the test? Which SUV took home the 46th annual 2019 SUV of the Year trophy? Read on for the answers to all of your questions.

5th Place

Land Rover Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

What’s New
The big news for the Range Rover Sport is plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) capability, a first for SUVOTY. Its components include a 2.0L turbocharged engine, 141hp electric motor, and a bank of batteries. The engine and electric motor combination make 392 hp and 472 lb-ft of torque. Mated to the engine is a ZF eight-speed automatic transmission (which is where the electric motor is located) that is said to complete each shift in only 200 milliseconds to create almost imperceptible gear changes. The vehicle we tested was fitted with the available two-speed transfer case, which has an electronically controlled multi-plate clutch in the center differential. This system can distribute torque between the wheels at any ratio between 100 percent front and 100 percent rear. Land Rover notes that EV mode does not affect the Sport’s 33.4-inch wading depth and it works with low-range gearing (though range is limited). The hybrid powerplant is in the same chassis that won our 2014 SUVOTY contest.

Ramp and Track
The Sport P400e earned a 469-point score on the 20-degree RTI ramp, a respectable score for a vehicle with fully independent suspension. During 0-60–mph testing at the track, the 5,430-pound vehicle turned a time of 6.9 seconds. It traveled the quarter-mile in 15.4 seconds at a speed of 93.2 mph. The Sport’s huge four-wheel disc brakes worked in conjunction with the Pirelli Scorpion tires to bring the SUV from 60-0 mph in an impressive 135.5 feet.

Exterior/Interior
On the outside, our testers appreciated the classic lines, with one judge noting that the Range Rover Sport looks like a “smoothed out, aerodynamic brick that makes a stately appearance.” Of course, that smooth, aerodynamic, elegant appearance has a downside—namely that the front and rear towhooks are hidden under the plastic bumpers where they are difficult to access. But hey, at least it has towhooks. Some comments from the judges regarding the interior: “Best seats I’ve sat on”; “Everything seems high-end, nice to the touch, and there’s a buttery sweet scent of high-quality leather”; and “Classy and contemporary.” Many judges complained about the transmission shifter, however, which seemed needlessly complicated and counterintuitive. And we didn’t care for the dual touchscreens, which we found to be confusing and slow to respond to input.

On-Road
On the open road and around town, it offered the comfort and refinement you expect from the brand. Steering response was excellent, and the huge brakes and grippy tires felt as though they could send you through the acoustic laminated windshield. “Highway ride, handling, and acceleration were, bar none, the best of the group,” one judge gushed. The Head-Up Display, adaptive cruise control, and Lane Keep Assist made the Range Rover duo the most advanced vehicles in the test, and these features minimized fatigue on long drives. Steering was “smooth and precise,” while handling and 4WD function on snow-covered roads were top notch. In EV mode, the Sport was virtually silent in operation and power was outstanding, though one tester reported some slight choppiness in the system during acceleration and merging. Unfortunately, due to our busy testing schedule and the lack of fast charging stations in the areas where the Sport was docked each evening, we were only able to fully charge the batteries once. Following that full charge, we were able to squeeze 21 miles from the batteries during in-town driving before they were depleted and the 2.0L engine took over. We also found that the system depleted the batteries, even with the “Save” feature (which is designed to lock out EV mode) engaged.

Off-Road
Overall, the Terrain Response 2 4WD system did a fantastic job of getting power to the Sport’s tires, though we still have no love for 21-inch wheels off-road. We’re not sure why, but the Sport seemed to come up a bit short this year on rocky trails, often struggling to provide power smoothly to the wheels. “Not the same Land Rover off-roading experience as in the past,” noted one judge. That said, the Sport was no slouch off-road, particularly in the sand dunes and on high-speed dirt roads. “Smooth, flickable, and controlled, with plenty of power,” was a typical comment. The air suspension didn’t top out like we have experienced with other vehicles fitted with independent suspension, thanks to over 10 inches of wheel travel at each corner. At the end of the day, the low-profile tires were the limiting factor, prompting one tester to ask: “I wonder if you could fit 18-inch wheels over the brakes? It would make this a completely different vehicle off-road.” Unfortunately, we didn’t get the chance to fully test the Sport on all-electric power off-road. This was due to the inability to fully charge the batteries on standard 120V hotel current during our short overnight hotel stays and the short range of the EV system.

Bottom Line
The Range Rover Sport P400e combines luxury features and off-road capability into one high-tech package, and it can proudly wear the Land Rover name. The PHEV capability is great for those who have a shorter commute, and we imagine the range will increase as EV technology moves forward.

Logbook Quotes
“Seems like a lot of effort to get it to charge for a lousy 31 miles.”
“Engine pulls like a V-8.”
“Feels like you are driving an iPad.”
“I feel like I need an electronics degree to operate the controls. Why two touchscreens? Why a million buttons on the steering wheel and dash? Not intuitive at all.”

What’s Hot:
Luxurious interior appointments, generous skidplating, air suspension, great on-road and off

What’s Not:
Low-profile street tires, low EV mode range, price

Our Take:
We really like the Range Rover Sport, and the EV tech is impressive. However, EV capabilities may be elusive for those who frequent the backcountry and rural areas where fast charging stations are limited. We’d opt for one of the impressive supercharged gasoline engines or the superb diesel.


4th Place

Land Rover Range Rover HSE P400e

What’s New
The Range Rover HSE P400e features the same new PHEV technology and 2.0L turbocharged engine found in the Range Rover Sport. In fact, our impressions of the two are quite similar. So, how do they differ? The wheelbase is almost identical; however, the Range Rover is 4.8 inches longer than the Sport. Another difference is price; the Range Rover we tested cost $18,000 more than the Sport. Both Range Rovers feature a lightweight, all-aluminum independent suspension system that uses a double-wishbone setup in the front and a multilink layout in the rear. This air-controlled suspension boasts 10.2 inches of front wheel travel and 10.7 inches of rear wheel travel. Like the Range Rover Sport, Land Rover says the addition of PHEV capability does not affect the wading depth of the vehicle.

Ramp and Track
The Range Rover scored an impressive 530 points on the 20-degree RTI ramp. On the track, the Range Rover performed very closely to the Sport, turning a time of 6.8 seconds from 0-60 mph. That isn’t on par with the Rover’s optional 550hp supercharged V-8 engine, but it was the fastest in this year’s test. The quarter-mile time was also the best: 15.3 seconds at a speed of 93.1 mph. When it came time to rein in the 5,500-pound SUV from 60-0 mph, the four-wheel disc brakes closed the deal in 142 feet.

Exterior/Interior
The exterior and interior of the Range Rover had some hits and misses. The exterior styling was praised for its elegance, and our testers found the Range Rover very easy to see out of on the trail. “Love the minimalist A-pillars and short hood,” one judge wrote. The tall seating position also assisted with the excellent visibility. The Range Rover received top scores for the interior due to the generous legroom, comfortable seats, high-quality materials, and both 12V and 110V outlets in the cargo area. “It has everything, including a fridge,” one judge joked, in reference to the cooled center console. Still, the Range Rover was not perfect. Many testers found the controls non-intuitive, and simple tasks like resetting the trip meter required referencing the owner’s manual. (Hint: It is on the end of the stalk on the left side of the steering column.)

On-Road
The Range Rover earned top marks here thanks to the comfortable seats and seating position, Head-Up Display, adaptive cruise control, and Lane Keep Assist. We could spend all day behind the wheel of the Range Rover and arrive at our destination feeling refreshed. Power from the turbocharged four-cylinder engine was immediate, with no signs of turbo lag. Add the eight-speed automatic transmission that performs lightning-fast shifts, and you have a potent combination to slice your way through traffic. To balance the power and handling, the Range Rover has a slew of advanced electronic and mechanical technologies to enhance dynamics. These controls are so seamless and transparent we didn’t even notice they were in full effect as we experienced and enjoyed the vehicle’s ride. Unfortunately, due to our busy testing schedule and the lack of fast charging stations in the areas where the Range Rover P400e was parked each evening, we were unable to fully charge the batteries and confirm the 31-mile advertised range. We can say that we did experience some driving in EV mode and it was refined, almost silent, and pleasantly powerful.

Off-Road
Judges were impressed with the Range Rover’s selectable Terrain Response system, skidplates, and a true locking rear axle and center differential. Less popular were the low-profile Goodyear Eagle tires on 21-inch rims that cost $390 each to replace (ask us how we know). The tires really are an Achilles’ heel off-road, which is regrettable because the Range Rover suspension has enough wheel travel to soak up most bumps at speed without any fuss. And the air suspension meant that we could increase the ride height for technical terrain, where the rear locking differential kept us moving forward. “I was shocked at how well it did in Rock Mode,” one particularly critical judge confessed. Though it was with a fair amount of “traction control nonsense,” wrote another. In sand, the 2.0L engine never seemed to lack power, and once the nannies were turned off the Range Rover was far more tossable than you would expect from a 5,500-pound vehicle. Overall, the system operates smoothly and seamlessly, though we wish there was a way to totally disengage the electronic controls and have complete control over the vehicle off-road. As with the Sport P400e, we didn’t get the chance to fully test the Range Rover on all-electric power off-road (due to the inability to fully charge the batteries on standard 120V hotel current during our short overnight hotel stays and the short range of the EV system).

Bottom Line
If you have the disposable income to buy the best of the best and want something to drive to your airplane hangar, even when it is snowing out or there are sand dunes and long stretches of rough trail in the way, the Range Rover P400e is for you. We applaud Land Rover for integrating EV technology into the Range Rover, and we think the range will be increased as the technology improves.

Logbook Quotes
“Is there such a thing as too much luxury?”
“The low-profile tires are a hinderance.”
“Love the Head-Up Display.”
“So many screens; can I watch TV while I am driving?”

What’s Hot:
Innovative drivetrain and technology, surprisingly capable for a luxury vehicle

What’s Not:
Low-profile tires, underwhelming plug-in hybrid system range, price

Our Take:
Best interior and best highway scores of the test. We are curious to see what the Range Rover could do with an aggressive set of tires.


3rd Place

Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite

What’s New
The Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk qualifies for 2019 with an all-new turbocharged, direct-injected 2.0L engine. This four-cylinder engine makes 270 hp and 275 lb-ft of torque, and it features engine start-stop technology, which optimizes fuel economy and decreases emissions. The engine is mated to a nine-speed transmission, which has been tuned to match the performance of the 2.0L engine. The transfer case–less Cherokee Trailhawk with the Active Drive Lock system includes a selectable rear locker and a two-speed Power Transfer Unit (PTU). Inside of each differential assembly is a set of 2.92:1 planetary gears that provide gear reduction. Trailhawk package features include improved approach and departure angles of 30 and 32 degrees, respectively; a 1-inch suspension lift; red towhooks; an exclusive Selec-Terrain Rock mode; hill descent control; 17-inch wheels; and a 19-inch water fording capability.

Ramp and Track
Suspension flex didn’t seem to be the Cherokee Trailhawk’s forte. On the 20-degree RTI ramp, it traveled 34 inches to earn a lowly score of 322 points. However, the Cherokee Trailhawk redeemed itself at the track. The turbocharged engine catapulted the 4,260-pound SUV from a dead stop to 60 mph in 7.7 seconds, and it made it through the quarter-mile in 16.0 seconds at a speed of 88.6 mph, 0.8 seconds faster in the quarter-mile than the 3.2L V-6 we tested in the past. In 60-0–mph braking, the Cherokee’s four-wheel disc brakes, antilock braking, and Firestone Destination A/T tires combined to bring the vehicle to a complete stop in 131 feet, the shortest stopping distance of the test.

Exterior/Interior
Judges praised the good approach and departure angles, easy-to-access front and rear towhooks, and flat-black hood graphics, among other things. Opinions were mixed on the styling, with judges feeling that the appearance is very car-like, particularly for a Jeep. In the end, styling is subjective, but function is not, and the Cherokee excelled in that regard. When it came to the interior, judges gave it high marks for its fit and finish, quality of materials, heated seats, navigation, and layout. Some felt that the rear seats had plenty of room for adults, while others felt that they were too cramped, which of course tended to reflect the size of the testers. Comments included: “Appreciate the analog controls”; “No Range Rover, but doesn’t feel cheap”; “I like the big speedo and tach”; and “Everything is where it should be.” Finally, we appreciated that the spare tire is located under the cargo floor inside the vehicle, not under the vehicle where it’s hard to access.

On-Road
The 2.0L did a fantastic job of propelling the Cherokee on the road. It provided low-end torque that eliminated any perceived turbo lag. When combined with the excellent nine-speed automatic, the Cherokee was surprisingly quick and nimble in traffic and out on the open road. In general, the Cherokee gained high marks for on-road manners. One judge wrote, “Smooth, yet sporty,” but several noted that the steering was too darty. What the Cherokee didn’t have in wheel travel on the RTI ramp, it more than made up for with sporty handling. Its car-based DNA was crystal clear. “Very much a ‘car’ experience on the highway,” noted one judge.

Off-Road
Despite the Cherokee Trailhawk’s less-than-stellar wheel travel, it did very well on the trail. In particular, all of our testers raved about how much fun the Cherokee was in the sand dunes. This is a testament to how well the traction control system and the rear locker work together to get power to the wheels. The impressive 48.4:1 crawl ratio gave us excellent crawlability, though we used the hill descent control to compensate for weak engine braking on steep hill descents. Judges also gave it good marks due to its performance on graded roads and in desert washes, although one judge did note that the shocks topped out at speed. On our gnarly loose hillclimb, the Cherokee churned its way to the top once we used the necessary amount of momentum, leaving the judges impressed.

Bottom Line
While it wasn’t necessarily the best at any specific task, the Cherokee was well rounded and excelled in a variety of areas. The Cherokee is way better than it has a right to be. It blows away everything else in its class when it comes to capability—good power despite the four-cylinder and good crawling prowess despite the lack of a transfer case.

Logbook quotes
“Drives like a car on the road (for better or worse).”
“Like a go-kart in the sand!”
“Everything inside is where it should be.”

What’s Hot:
Rear locker and real recovery points in a compact SUV

What’s Not:
Lack of wheel travel and ground clearance limits off-road ability

Our Take:
The best in the segment—worthy of carrying the Jeep name


2nd Place

Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro

What’s New
The TRD Pro package fits the 4Runner with a variety of items, including new-for-2019 TRD-tuned high-performance Fox internal bypass shocks. Compared to the non-TRD Pro 4Runner, each front shock has a larger-diameter piston and shaft, and each remote-reservoir rear shock has a larger piston. The TRD Pro has TRD-tuned front springs that provide a 1-inch lift, and Toyota says that the TRD Pro suspension has 0.75 inch of additional wheel travel up front and 1.4 inches of additional wheel travel in the rear. Other TRD Pro features include LED foglights, 17-inch TRD alloy wheels, Nitto Terra Grappler tires, TRD-stamped front skidplate, unique front grille, black badging and lower bumper accents, TRD floor mats, and a TRD shift knob.

Ramp and Track
Our TRD Pro tester drove 55 inches up the 20-degree RTI ramp to earn a score of 501 points. At the track, the 4.0L V-6 engine pulled the 4,750-pound SUV to 60 mph from a standing stop in 8.8 seconds, and the TRD Pro traversed the quarter-mile in 16.7 seconds at 84.7 mph. The four-wheel vented disc brakes helped to take the rig from 60-0 mph in 134.1 feet.

Exterior/Interior
The 4Runner TRD Pro was an exercise in contrasts. Outside was the hip Voodoo Blue paint and aggressive front end, while inside the 4Runner felt like a flashback to 1999. Age notwithstanding, the interior was still plenty functional with good seating and easy-to-understand HVAC controls and switchgear, although some testers didn’t care for the overhead controls for the rear locking differential and Crawl Control. Also, that flashback isn’t entirely a bad thing, as we appreciated that the 4Runner was the only vehicle in the test that used an actual key in the ignition, and it was also one of only two rigs with an honest-to-goodness transfer case shift lever.

On-Road
In typical Toyota fashion, the 4Runner TRD Pro is quiet and smooth on the pavement. The V-6 was adequate but far from exciting, with one tester noting, “This 4Runner would be a lot of fun with another 100 hp and a manual transmission.” The five-speed automatic transmission had the least number of gears in the test, yet it seemed to be hunting and shifting more than any of the other vehicles. Road noise was minimal due to the tall gears that keep the rpm down on the freeway, but several testers noted that the steering felt heavy.

Off-Road
The 4Runner owned it off-road. Even with the Wrangler present, the suspension on the 4Runner made it our top choice in the dunes and on fast dirt roads. Overall, judges spoke highly of the TRD Pro, saying, “The TRD Pro was in its element off-road. It dominated the sand.” They also noted, “There aren’t many places it won’t go.” High-speed sections were a blast, and we never could bottom out the suspension on the TRD Pro no matter how hard we pushed it. The selectable rear locker, Crawl Control, great approach angle, and good ground clearance meant that the TRD Pro’s prowess wasn’t limited to just high-speed wheeling. “I think of this as a prerunner, but it was surprisingly capable in the rocks,” one tester noted. We liked the function and easy operation of the rear locker, though we wish it engaged in high range as well as low range. We were pleased to see one rear and two front tow loops, but we wish they were larger in diameter. The 4Runner TRD Pro handled rocks with ease thanks in part to the aforementioned locker. Turn off the electronic nannies, and the TRD Pro was very capable and a lot of fun in the snow.

Bottom Line
Perhaps the most telling sign of the TRD Pro’s capabilities is that it was a staff favorite in the sand and on fast dirt roads. The 4Runner may be getting up in years, but the TRD Pro enhancements have taught an old dog new tricks.

Logbook Quotes
“Thank goodness for the transfer case shift lever.”
“The sucker fish grille ruins an otherwise handsome SUV.”
“The suspension is unstoppable.”
“Feels dated and plasticky.”

What’s Hot:
Internal bypass shocks, rear locker, body-on-frame construction

What’s Not:
Dated interior, lack of power

Our Take:
The vehicle to buy if you plan to keep it for the next 20 years.


Winner!

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon

What’s New
The Wrangler was completely redesigned for the 2018 model year, but the all-new JL wasn’t available for 2018 SUVOTY, making it eligible for 2019. The JL is available in a variety of configurations and trim levels, including Sport, Sport S, Sahara, and Rubicon models with two or four doors (Unlimited), with either the trusty 3.6L Pentastar V-6 engine or an all-new 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder engine coupled to a 48V generator that Jeep calls eTorque. Our Unlimited tester was a Rubicon model with the 2.0L turbo engine and a soft top. The Rubicon package includes locking differentials front and rear, a disconnecting front sway bar, 4:1 transfer case, steel bumpers, larger fender openings, and 33-inch-tall BFGoodrich All-Terrain KO2 tires.

Ramp and Track
The Wrangler scored an impressive 693 points on our 20-degree RTI ramp with the electronic sway bar disconnected. On the track, the 270hp turbocharged engine and eight-speed 850RE automatic transmission helped it chalk up a 0-60 time of 8.1 seconds and a quarter-mile time of 16.5 seconds at 87.4 mph. These times weren’t blisteringly fast, but they did improve on the times of the last 3.6L Pentastar–powered Wrangler we tested. The four-wheel discs on the Wrangler brought it from 60-0 mph in 139.7 feet.

Exterior/Interior
The JL features a completely redesigned exterior and interior relative to the outgoing JK Wrangler. Aluminum doors and hood helped to shed 200 pounds, and the doors have staggered pins to make them easy to install on the hinges after a day on the trail. Well done, Jeep. Unfortunately, the hood louvers are not functional—one of the few things on the Wrangler that isn’t. The bumpers and rock sliders are made from steel, and open towhooks are found front and rear. The windshield is also much easier to put down relative to the outgoing model, but the window controls are still in the center stack. We will never get used to the window controls on the Wrangler, but we can get over it, particularly when there is still a lever-operated transfer case. The step-in height in the JL is high, as with past Wranglers. Once we got inside though, the optional leather seats, 8.4-inch Uconnect screen, and simple controls made us forget about the higher-than-average step-in height. While there is still some room for improvement on the materials used in the interior, this is the nicest Wrangler ever made.

On-Road
The Wrangler wasn’t the quietest or best-handling vehicle on the pavement, but it is light-years ahead of the outgoing JK. “I actually had a conversation on the phone in a soft top Jeep! That is a first for me,” one judge noted. Power from the 2.0L turbocharged engine and the eight-speed automatic transmission didn’t fool us into thinking that the Wrangler had a V-8 under the hood, but it was brisk, providing plenty of passing power on the freeway. The relatively high center of gravity and solid axles that make the Wrangler so adept on the trail are a liability on the pavement, but the reconfigured suspension with outboard shock absorbers and spot-on spring rates minimize the compromises. One gripe: The transmission tunnel still interferes with the driver’s right throttle foot like the JK did, and on extended drives one judge noted that it was the cause of an achy knee.

Off-Road
This is what the Wrangler was made for, but does it live up to the hype? The short answer is yes! “Confidence” was the word our judges used most when describing the Wrangler. We expected the JL Rubicon to be the most capable vehicle in technical terrain, and nothing else in a test of incredibly capable vehicles could hold a candle to the Wrangler Rubicon. With body-on-frame construction and solid axles, the visibility, articulation, and traction are unmatched. This is the last of an era of vehicles where the driver has control of the vehicle, rather than relying solely on traction control and electronics to overcome obstacles. Those systems have become incredibly sophisticated over the last decade and there is no denying that they work, but that doesn’t mean that we prefer them to a low-geared transfer case and locking differentials. What really surprised us though was how well the JL performed in the sand dunes and on fast two-track roads, situations where the Wrangler was at a distinct disadvantage in the past. The JL still couldn’t keep up with the 4Runner TRD Pro in these situations, but the gap definitely got much smaller than it has been in the past.

Bottom Line
With locking differentials, a disconnecting front sway bar, and a 4:1 transfer case, the Wrangler Rubicon is the most capable SUV on the planet. The latest iteration minimizes any compromises for day-to-day use on the road.

Logbook Quotes
“I would opt for the hardtop.”
“Not my first choice on icy roads.”
“I wish you could get a manual transmission with the turbo engine.”
“This Jeep makes very few compromises.”

What’s Hot:
Solid axles, locking differentials, all-terrain tires

What’s Not:
We wouldn’t complain about more horsepower

Our Take:
The 2019 SUV of the Year.


How We Test ’Em

Our week of testing for 2019 SUV of the Year started on the pavement measuring the Ramp Travel Index (RTI), allowing us to quantify each vehicle’s suspension travel. Up next, it was off to the Auto Club Dragway in Fontana, California, where we used a RaceLogic Performance Box to gather real-world acceleration and braking data. Testing continued onto the open road, convoy-style, as we drove the paved highways to the mountains, studying how each rig performed in areas of road noise, fuel consumption, handling, and more. Over the next three days, we drove the vehicles in almost every terrain and off-road situation possible. Nothing was off-limits—from city stoplights and sand dunes to rocky climbs, mud ruts, and snowed-over hills. We tested the rigs each day from dawn to well past sunset. Including our final procession back to the Los Angeles area, we drove each vehicle approximately 1,000 miles on- and off-road

How We Score ’Em

Our scoring procedure utilized five weighted categories. Here’s the breakdown: 30 percent Trail Performance (how a vehicle performs in a variety of wheeling environments and off-road-centric features like 4WD system operation, tires, traction aids, and so on), 25 percent Empirical (RTI, acceleration, braking, price, and so on), 20 percent On Pavement (handling, ride quality, steering feel, and so on), 15 percent Interior (instrumentation, ingress and egress, seat comfort, storage, and so on), and 10 percent Exterior (appearance, stance, body protection, and so on).

Final Results

WranglerCherokeeRange RoverRange Rover Sport4Runner
Trail Performance26.4620.3416.2815.9722.77
Empirical20.3619.8220.5421.2518.57
On-Road Performance13.5613.0015.07 14.6413.00
Interior10.509.6510.6710.339.30
Exterior8.545.766.005.906.24
Total79.4268.5768.5668.0969.88


Judges’ Picks

Which of the five vehicles from this year’s SUV of the Year would you bring home if scorebooks went out the window and price tags didn’t matter? We asked each of our judges to make that choice and give some reasons why each rig hit or missed the mark. Here’s what they had to say.

Stuart Bourdon, Jp Magazine Technical Editor
This category for 2019 was all over the map, with two Land Rovers, a Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro, a Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite, and a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. The Wrangler JL came outfitted with the 2.0L inline four-cylinder direct-injection turbo eTorque engine, eight-speed automatic transmission, the 4:1 Rock-Trac HD part-time 4WD system, and electric lockers front and rear. The Rovers were sumptuous and inviting, and the 4Runner TRD Pro and Cherokee Trailhawk were fun to drive, but none could best the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon powered by the spunky 2.0L turbo motor. The Wrangler JL was a masterpiece of capability in all terrain situations, and that small-but-capable engine could catapult the vehicle into action on- or off-road and maintain momentum through everything we threw it into.

Ken Brubaker, Four Wheeler Editor
For my lifestyle and the type of wheeling I do, the Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro makes the most sense. I’d be envious of my colleagues as they passed me in the rocks with their convoy of JLs with front and rear lockers engaged, tops down, and doors off, but they wouldn’t have much of a lead on me because the 4Runner TRD Pro has proven itself to be very good in the rocks. And I’d smoke ’em on the long, rough dirt road back to town thanks to the TRD Pro’s impressive suspension with Fox shocks. Heck, I’d be back at camp pretending to be busy with the campfire long before those guys rolled in. And I could load over 650 more pounds of cargo into my ’Runner and tow 1,500 more pounds than they could.

John Cappa, Four Wheeler Contributor
Any SUV can perform daily commutes, but when I choose an SUV, it has to be something I’d feel safe driving 100 miles or more off-road through the middle of nowhere all alone in the desert. Of course, every vehicle in this year’s test could accomplish that task, but none of them could do it as effortlessly and as comfortably as the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. There is never any question about tire durability, ground clearance, or capability with the Wrangler. I like having that built-in security of knowing that the Wrangler is the most capable new SUV currently available and ready for whatever off-road obstacle waits around the bend.

Christian Hazel, 4-Wheel & Off-Road Editor
If I don’t pick the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, I sort of have to turn in my man card. The JL packs in all the greasy, deep-fried features an off-road carnivore like me dreams about. But I spend such an inordinate amount of time in a vehicle traveling the highways and backroads that it’d be hard not to select the big Rover P400e with all its cushy creature comforts, supple leather, and…oh, hell—you know what, make mine a Rubicon. The first time I have to change one of those silly low-profile tires I’ll be wishing I had the JL. It’s way more a real Jeep than the JK ever pretended to be. I really dig that vehicle, and despite its different low-speed operation compared with the 3.6L model, I do honestly dig the 2.0L eTorque engine system.

Sean Holman, MotorTrend Group Content Director
I love the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. I even bought a JK after it won FWOTY a second time. But driving the new JL has me jealous, because Jeep updated the Wrangler without at all diluting the formula, and I want one badly. The JL is a better Wrangler in every single sense. It’s more comfortable, higher quality, has more technology, more features, more capability, and Jeep fixed 90 percent of the little things we found annoying about the JK. The JL is hands down the best version of the Wrangler ever, so don’t be surprised if history repeats itself and I am back at the dealer within the year.

Jered Korfhage, Four Wheeler Feature Editor
My SUV has to do it all—period. The Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon means zero compromise between “I can thump this on the trails” and “will still coddle Dad on the Saturday commute to the market.” Leather-trimmed seats? Check. Care for a solid axle and locking diff? I’ll take two. Where’s the 4WD shift button? It’s a lever, and it’s on the floor—where it should be. All of this while eating bumps in the road with the smoothness of an IFS rig.

John Lehenbauer, Diesel Power Technical Editor
There was an interesting mix of drivetrains in the SUV group this year. The high-end Range Rover and Range Rover Sport PHEVs were luxurious and worked well for what they are, but they were way too complicated for an off-roader. I like the simplistic drivetrains, which make rest of the vehicles in the test more appealing. Initially I had my doubts about the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon with a four-cylinder turbocharged engine and eight-speed automatic, but the little engine’s ability really started to grow on me. The engine and transmission combo had a good balance of power and drivability that was evident both on- and off-road. The Jeep’s off-road capability is what sealed the deal; having front and rear selectable lockers, a disconnecting sway bar, and a 4:1 transfer case made it hard to beat, especially for someone like me who likes to spend as much time as possible off-road.

Trent McGee, Four Wheeler Contributor
The Wrangler has over 70 years of heritage in the dirt behind it, and it shows. Jeep has done an amazing job addressing the major gripes of the JK, and the JL is a better Jeep in every way. Off-road attributes usually mean sacrificing on-road comfort and handling, but this Wrangler is about as refined as you can get and still have solid axles. I found the Jeep docile and comfortable on the street, and I think it would be an acceptable daily driver even with a soft top (which is amazing, by the way). Off-road there’s no contest. Front and rear lockers, 4:1 transfer case, sway bar disconnects, a supple suspension, and an amazing turbocharged four-cylinder equals dominance in most areas. Given just about any scenario off the pavement or on, the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon would be my choice.

Verne Simons, 4-Wheel & Off-Road Technical Editor
I wish I could say this is a tough decision, but it isn’t. The Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon is an easy winner for me. I want one. That 2.0L somehow makes gobs of usable power just about everywhere. The JL soaks up bumps amazingly well for a solid-axle 4x4. The eight-speed is well matched to the little engine. It has a transfer case with a lever and two real lockers. I also do love the 4Runner, which also has a rear locker, a manual shift T-case, and dialed traction control, but it is flatly out-skilled by the ninja of a 4x4 that the JL is. The 4Runner’s suspension might be a notch or two above the Jeep’s in the bumps, but the 4.0L seems anemic everywhere in comparison to the 2.0L DI turbo in the Wrangler and Cherokee. The Cherokee is rad, fast, and a hoot in the sand, but it feels fragile on dirt roads and trails. The two Range Rovers each make for an awesome and capable on-road daily driver, but they fall short on the trail. How their 2.0L turbos make even more power than the Jeep’s is just inconceivable.

Harry Wagner, Four Wheeler Contributor
As much as I appreciate the technology in the Range Rovers and have a bias toward Toyotas, the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon is the easy answer here. It has all the capabilities that the public has come to expect, with locking differentials, a 4:1 transfer case, and electronic disconnecting front sway bar, but Jeep has really minimized any compromises on the road with the revised suspension geometry and excellent drivetrain package with the 2.0L eTorque engine and eight-speed transmission. It even shined in the sand dunes, where you wouldn’t expect a vehicle with solid axles to overshadow the competition.


Vehicle/model: ’19 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk Elite

Base price: $33,320
Price as tested: $42,695
Options as tested: Trailhawk Elite Package 2ZL ($2,995), Technology Group ($995), 2.0L I-4 DOHC DI Turbo Engine ($500), Full Sunroof with Power Front and Fixed Rear ($1,295), 9-Amplified Speakers with Subwoofer ($695), Uconnect 4C NAV with 8.4-inch Display ($795), 17x7.5-inch Black Painted Aluminum Wheels ($655), Destination Charge ($1,445)

ENGINE
Type: 16-valve DOHC I-4
Displacement (ci/liter): 121/2.0
Bore x stroke (in): 3.31x3.54
Compression ratio (:1): 10.0
Intake/FI: Turbocharged/direct injection
Mfg.’s power rating @ rpm (hp): 270 @ 5,250
Mfg.’s torque rating @ rpm (lb-ft): 295 @ 3,000
Mfg.’s suggested fuel type: Premium unleaded

DRIVETRAIN
Transmission: 948TE 9-spd automatic
Ratios (:1):
First: 4.71
Second: 2.84
Third: 1.91
Fourth: 1.38
Fifth: 1.00
Sixth: 0.81
Seventh: 0.70
Eighth: 0.58
Ninth: 0.48
Reverse: 3.83
Axle ratio (:1): 3.73
Transfer case: N/A (two-speed Power Transfer Unit)
Low-range ratio (:1): 2.92
Crawl ratio (:1): 51.3

FRAME/BODY
Frame: Steel uniframe
Body: Aluminum and steel

SUSPENSION/AXLES
Front: MacPherson strut, long-travel coil springs, one-piece steel sub-frame, aluminum lower control arms, stabilizer bar/AAM, 5.2-in PTU ring gear Rear: Four-link with trailing arm, aluminum lateral links, high-strength steel rear cradle, coil springs, stabilizer bar/AAM, 6.5-in RDM ring gear, electric locker

STEERING
Type: Electric power rack-and-pinion
Turns (lock-to-lock): 2.7
Ratio (:1): 15.4

BRAKES
Front: 13.0x1.10-in disc, twin-piston caliper
Rear: 12.6x0.47-in disc, single-piston caliper
ABS: Four-wheel

WHEELS/TIRES
Wheels (in): 17x7.5 aluminum
Tires: P245/65R17 Firestone Destination A/T

FUEL ECONOMY
EPA city/highway: 20/26
Observed city/highway/trail: 20.8

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES
Weight (lb): 4,260
Wheelbase (in): 107.1
Overall length (in): 182.9
Overall width (in): 74.9
Height (in): 67.8
Track f/r (in): 63.6/63.5
Minimum ground clearance (in): 8.7
Turning diameter, curb-to-curb (ft): 38.1
Approach/departure angles (deg): 29.9/32.2
Breakover angle (deg): 22.9
GVWR (lb): 5,500
Payload (lb): 1,000
Maximum towing capacity (lb): 4,000
Seating: 5
Fuel capacity (gal): 15.9

PERFORMANCE
0-60 mph (sec): 7.7
Quarter-mile (sec @ mph): 16.0 @ 88.6
Braking 60-0 mph (ft): 131.0
Ramp Travel Index (20-deg, points): 322

Vehicle/model: ’19 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon

Base price: $41,545
Price as tested: $55,760
Options as tested: Leather-Trimmed Bucket Seats ($1,495), Customer Preferred Package 28R ($795), LED Lighting Group ($995), Electronic Infotainment System Group ($1,595), Jeep Active Safety Group ($895), Adaptive Cruise Control/Forward Collision Warning ($795), Steel Bumper Group ($1,295), Trail Rail Management Group ($195), Soft Top Window Storage Bag ($75), 8-Speed Automatic Transmission ($2,000), 2.0-Liter I-4 DOHC DI Turbo eTorque Engine ($1,000), Remote Proximity Keyless Entry ($495), Body-Color Fender Flares ($495), Premium Black Sunrider Soft Top ($595), Destination Charge ($1,495)

ENGINE
Type: 16-valve DOHC I-4 w/eTorque
Displacement (ci/liter): 121/2.0
Bore x stroke (in): 3.31x3.54
Compression ratio (:1): 10.0
Intake/FI: Turbocharged/direct injection
Mfg.’s power rating @ rpm (hp): 270 @ 5,250
Mfg.’s torque rating @ rpm (lb-ft): 295 @ 3,000
Mfg.’s suggested fuel type: Regular unleaded

DRIVETRAIN
Transmission: 850RE 8-spd automatic
Ratios (:1):
First: 4.71
Second: 3.13
Third: 2.10
Fourth: 1.67
Fifth: 1.28
Sixth: 1.00
Seventh: 0.84
Eighth: 0.67
Reverse: 3.53
Axle ratio (:1): 4.10
Transfer case: NV241OR Rock-Trac
Low-range ratio (:1): 4.00
Crawl ratio (:1): 77.2

FRAME/BODY
Frame: Steel, ladder-type
Body: Aluminum and steel

SUSPENSION/AXLES
Front: Solid axle, link coil, leading arms, track bar, coil springs, electronically controlled sway bar disconnect, twin-tube shocks/third-generation Dana 44, Tru-Lok electric locker
Rear: Solid axle, link coil, leading arms, track bar, coil springs, stabilizer bar, twin-tube shocks/third-generation Dana 44, Tru-Lok electric locker

STEERING
Type: Electro-hydraulic power
Turns (lock-to-lock): 3.2
Ratio (:1): 15.6

BRAKES
Front: 12.9x1.10-in disc, twin-piston caliper
Rear: 13.4x0.55-in disc, single-piston caliper
ABS: Four-wheel

WHEELS/TIRES
Wheels (in): 17x8 aluminum
Tires: LT285/70R17 BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2

FUEL ECONOMY
EPA city/highway: 22/24
Observed city/highway/trail: 16.4

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES
Weight (lb): 4,455
Wheelbase (in): 118.4
Overall length (in): 188.4
Overall width (in): 73.8
Height (in): 73.6
Track f/r (in): 62.9/62.9
Minimum ground clearance (in): 10.8
Turning diameter, curb-to-curb (ft): 39.4
Approach/departure angles (deg): 43.8/37
Breakover angle (deg): 22.6
GVWR (lb): 5,625
Payload (lb): 892
Maximum towing capacity (lb): 3,500
Seating: 5
Fuel capacity (gal): 21.5

PERFORMANCE
0-60 mph (sec): 8.1
Quarter-mile (sec @ mph): 16.5 @ 87.4
Braking 60-0 mph (ft): 139.7
Ramp Travel Index (20-deg, points): 693

Vehicle/model: ’19 Range Rover HSE P400e

Base price: $95,450
Price as tested: $108,145
Options as tested: Driver Assist Pack ($4,000), 21-inch Split-Spoke Style 7001 with Light Silver Diamond Turned Finish ($2,855), Shadow Exterior Pack ($1,090), Vision Assist Pack ($1,785), Front Center Console with Refrigerator Compartment ($715), 20-Way Heated-Cooled Front Seats with Power Recline and Heated/Cooled Rear Seats ($610), Four Zone Climate Control ($410), Cabin Air Ionization ($100), A110-V Power Outlet ($135), Destination Charge ($995)

ENGINE
Type: 16-valve I-4 w/Plug-In Hybrid Electric Motor
Displacement (ci/liter): 121.9/2.0
Bore x stroke (in): 3.27x3.63
Compression ratio (:1): 9.5
Intake/FI: Turbocharged/direct injection
Mfg.’s power rating @ rpm (hp): 398 @ 5,600
Mfg.’s torque rating @ rpm (lb-ft): 472 @ 4,400
Mfg.’s suggested fuel type: Premium unleaded

DRIVETRAIN
Transmission: 8P75XPH 8-spd automatic
Ratios (:1):
First: 4.71
Second: 3.14
Third: 2.11
Fourth: 1.67
Fifth: 1.29
Sixth: 1.00
Seventh: 0.84
Eighth: 0.67
Reverse: 3.32
Axle ratio (:1): 3.73
Transfer case: Magna Steyr Dual-Clutch ITC 2-spd
Low-range ratio (:1): 2.93
Crawl ratio (:1): 51.5

FRAME/BODY
Frame: Aluminum unibody
Body: Aluminum and steel

SUSPENSION/AXLES
Front: SLA suspension with twin lower links, coil springs, passive dampers and passive ARB /Dana AdvanTEK M200
Rear: Integral link suspension with coil springs, passive dampers and passive ARB /Dana AdvanTEK M220

STEERING
Type: Electric power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Turns (lock-to-lock): 3.0
Ratio (:1): 19.4

BRAKES
Front: 15.0x1.34-in vented disc, six-piston caliper
Rear: 14.4x0.98-in vented disc, single-piston caliper
ABS: Four-wheel

WHEELS/TIRES
Wheels (in): 21x9.5 aluminum
Tires: P275/45R21 Goodyear Eagle F1

FUEL ECONOMY
EPA city/highway: N/A
Observed city/highway/trail: 17.5

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES
Weight (lb): 5,515
Wheelbase (in): 115
Overall length (in): 196.9
Overall width (in): 81.6
Height (in): 73.6 (normal) 76.5 (raised)
Track f/r (in): 66.6/66.4
Minimum ground clearance (in): 8.7 (normal), 11.7 (raised)
Turning diameter, curb-to-curb (ft): 40.5
Approach/departure angles (deg): 24.0 (normal), N/A (raised)/23.5 (normal), 27.6 (raised)
Breakover angle (deg): 20.1 (normal), 28.2 (raised)
GVWR (lb): 7,077
Payload (lb): 1,562
Maximum towing capacity (lb): 2,500
Seating: 7
Fuel capacity (gal): 24.1

PERFORMANCE
0-60 mph (sec): 6.8
Quarter-mile (sec @ mph): 15.3 @ 93.1
Braking 60-0 mph (ft): 142.0
Ramp Travel Index (20-deg, points): 530

Vehicle/model: ’19 Range Rover Sport HSE P400e

Base price: $78,300
Price as tested: $92,200
Options as tested: Driver Assist Pack ($4,000), Climate Comfort Pack ($1,385), Vision Assist Pack ($1,635), Ebony Morzine Headlining ($355), Black Contrast Roof ($665), Grand Black Veneer ($355), Soft Door Close ($610), Firenze Red Paint ($710), Cabin Air Ionization ($100), 21-Inch 5 Split Spoke Style 5085 w/Silver Finish Wheels ($1,835), Heated & Cooled Front & Rear Seats ($1,120), Domestic 110-Volt Power Socket ($135), Destination Charge ($995)

ENGINE
Type: 16-valve I-4 w/Plug-In Hybrid Electric Motor
Displacement (ci/liter): 121.9/2.0
Bore x stroke (in): 3.27x3.63
Compression ratio (:1): 9.5
Intake/FI: Turbocharged/direct injection
Mfg.’s power rating @ rpm (hp): 398 @ 5,550
Mfg.’s torque rating @ rpm (lb-ft): 472 @ 4,000
Mfg.’s suggested fuel type: Premium unleaded

DRIVETRAIN
Transmission: 8P75XPH 8-spd automatic
Ratios (:1):
First: 4.71
Second: 3.14
Third: 2.11
Fourth: 1.67
Fifth: 1.29
Sixth: 1.00
Seventh: 0.84
Eighth: 0.67
Reverse: 3.32
Axle ratio (:1): 3.73
Transfer case: Magna Steyr Dual-Clutch ITC 2-spd
Low-range ratio (:1): 2.93
Crawl ratio (:1): 51.5

FRAME/BODY
Frame: Aluminum unibody
Body: Aluminum and steel

SUSPENSION/AXLES
Front: SLA suspension with twin lower links, air springs, active dampers, and passive ARB /Dana AdvanTEK M200
Rear: Integral link suspension with air springs, active dampers, and passive ARB/Dana AdvanTEK M220

STEERING
Type: Electric power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Turns (lock-to-lock): 2.7
Ratio (:1): 17.7

BRAKES
Front: 15.0x1.34-in vented disc, six-piston caliper
Rear: 14.4x0.98-in vented disc, single-piston caliper
ABS: Four-wheel

WHEELS/TIRES
Wheels (in): 21x9.5 aluminum
Tires: P275/45R21 Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season

FUEL ECONOMY
EPA city/highway: N/A
Observed city/highway/trail: 17.5

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES
Weight (lb): 5,430
Wheelbase (in): 115.1
Overall length (in): 192.1
Overall width (in): 81.6
Height (in): 71
Track f/r (in): 66.6/66.4
Minimum ground clearance (in): 8.4 (normal), 11.3 (raised)
Turning diameter, curb-to-curb (ft): 40.6
Approach/departure angles (deg): 26.0 (normal), 29.1 (raised)/26.2 (normal), 28.5 (raised)
Breakover angle (deg): 21.2 (normal), 25.7 (raised)
GVWR (lb): 7,055
Payload (lb): 1,625
Maximum towing capacity (lb): 5,511
Seating: 7
Fuel capacity (gal): 24.1

PERFORMANCE
0-60 mph (sec): 6.9
Quarter-mile (sec @ mph): 15.4 @ 93.2
Braking 60-0 mph (ft): 135.5
Ramp Travel Index (20-deg, points): 469

Vehicle/model: ’19 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro

Base price: $46,415
Price as tested: $47,915
Options as tested: Hitch Ball Mount ($60), Paint Protection Film ($395), Destination Charge ($1,045)

ENGINE
Type: 24-valve DOHC V-6
Displacement (ci/liter): 241.4/4.0
Bore x stroke (in): 3.70x3.74
Compression ratio (:1): 10.4
Intake/FI: Naturally aspirated/EFI
Mfg.’s power rating @ rpm (hp): 270 @ 5,600
Mfg.’s torque rating @ rpm (lb-ft): 278 @ 4,400
Mfg.’s suggested fuel type: Regular unleaded

DRIVETRAIN
Transmission: A750F 5-spd automatic
Ratios (:1):
First: 3.52
Second: 2.04
Third: 1.40
Fourth: 1.00
Fifth: 0.72
Reverse: 3.22
Axle ratio (:1): 3.73
Transfer case: Aisin Seiki VF2A
Low-range ratio (:1): 2.57
Crawl ratio (:1): 33.7

FRAME/BODY
Frame: Steel ladder
Body: Reinforced steel

SUSPENSION/AXLES
Front: TRD-tuned coil springs, independent double-wishbone suspension with stabilizer bar, TRD Fox 2.5-in internal bypass shocks/Toyota 8.1-in
Rear: Coil spring four-link rigid type with stabilizer bar, 2.0-in TRD Fox internal bypass shocks with piggyback reservoir/Toyota 8.2-in, electric locker

STEERING
Type: Power-assisted variable-gear rack-and-pinion
Turns (lock-to-lock): 2.7
Ratio (:1): 18.4

BRAKES
Front: 13.3-in disc, twin-piston calipers
Rear: 12.3-in disc, single-piston calipers
ABS: Four-wheel

WHEELS/TIRES
Wheels (in): 17x7 aluminum
Tires: P265/70R17 Nitto Terra Grappler

FUEL ECONOMY
EPA city/highway: 17/20
Observed city/highway/trail: 16.2

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES
Weight (lb): 4,750
Wheelbase (in): 109.8
Overall length (in): 191.3
Overall width (in): 75.8
Height (in): 72 w/roof rack
Track f/r (in): 64.1/64.1
Minimum ground clearance (in): 9.6
Turning diameter, curb-to-curb (ft): 37.4
Approach/departure angles (deg): 33/26
Breakover angle (deg): N/A
GVWR (lb): 6,300
Payload (lb): 1,550
Maximum towing capacity (lb): 5,000
Seating: 5
Fuel capacity (gal): 23

PERFORMANCE
0-60 mph (sec): 8.8
Quarter-mile (sec @ mph): 16.7 @ 84.7
Braking 60-0 mph (ft): 134.1
Ramp Travel Index (20-deg, points): 501

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