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Long-Term Updates - August 2012

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Jerrod Jones | Writer
Posted August 1, 2012

Sure, it works great for the first week, but what about after?

Go Ahead—Ask Us!

What do you want to know about? Is there something we tried out in the pages of this magazine that you would like to know more about? Send an email to updates@off-roadweb.com and we’ll make sure we get you an answer.


TrailReady Wheels

This is the first bolt-on, bead-ring-type beadlock wheel our editor-in-chief has ever run. So far so good. The air pressure had been set to 30 psi about four months before a trip to Moab, Utah, when we checked the air pressure and retorqued all the bolts (on all four wheels). Almost all the bolts were fine and needed no tightening. We did break one bolt on one wheel when tightening. The biggest air pressure drop was five pounds on one wheel-and-tire combo, and the rest were two, three, and three pounds down from the original 30-psi mark.

During the Moab trip, we had no problems running on 10 psi and sideloading the tire constantly, never breaking a bead. Two of the beadlock rings are a little rock-rashed. The best part is that we can just replace the beadlock rings when they are finally too damaged.


Flex-a-Chill

We don’t believe in snake oil and were therefore a little skeptical at first, but when some Flex-a-Chill showed up at our office we figured “Why not?” and dumped the special coolant additive into a Flex-a-Lite radiator in a project truck. We saw a highway-speed running temperature drop of about 15 degrees—a surprise to us. This has also resulted in the electric fans switching on a lot less than they used to during slow-speed trailrides.


Caliper Hangers

Our buddy, “Rock,” had these Velcro strap hangers made by Husky in his tool bag. He was helping us change some hubs when he pulled them out and hung our calipers by them. They were a Godsend. We’ve seen zip ties break and coat hangers bend as a caliper fell to the floor, sometimes ripping off the brake line on the way down. These Husky straps were heavy-duty, reusable, and are cheaper than just one of the stainless braided brake lines we’ve had to replace.

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