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Kopycinski's Brain - Changing Ford TTB Camber

Posted in How To on December 1, 2012 Comment (0)
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There are three main front axle adjustments when it comes to alignment: toe-in, caster, and camber. Toe-in is how much the tires point towards each other when aimed down the road. Caster is the angle which the steering angle is tipped forward or backward from straight vertical. Camber is how much the tires are tipped from vertical when viewed from the front of the vehicle.

Camber is not affected when a straight front axle rig is lifted, but camber is directly affected when a Ford Twin Traction Beam (TTB) front suspension is raised. This configuration uses two long suspension beams that pivot from fixed points. Whenever lift is added, the beams drop downward at an angle and camber is increased positively. That is, the top portion of each tire will lean out further away from the vehicle than the bottom will.

The Ford TTB suspension uses camber bushings on the top of the upper ball joints to set this angle. Any competent alignment shop should be able to correct your camber. If you want to do the adjustment yourself, you can at least get it close to spec, or certainly correct extreme camber angles to restore the suspension to decent handling. Generally, if you change camber bushing angle, you’ll also need to adjust the tie rods to correct toe-in.

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Each camber bushing sits on the top of the upper ball joint and is held tight with the ball joint nut. The outside the bushing fits into a bore in the TTB knuckle and the inside of the bushing is tapered to mate to the ball joint stud.

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