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A Hi-Lift Attachment You Need

Posted in How To on January 1, 2001
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A large trailer-like hitch pin keeps the Jack-Mate secured to the jack. The spiked end keeps the jack from slipping on loose surfaces. We were surprised that it was more stable than the factory Hi-Lift baseplate. A large trailer-like hitch pin keeps the Jack-Mate secured to the jack. The spiked end keeps the jack from slipping on loose surfaces. We were surprised that it was more stable than the factory Hi-Lift baseplate.
The Jack-Mate comes with a disconnect pin that replaces the cotter pin in the baseplate. It has uses on both ends of a Hi-Lift so the pins simplify assembling the jack in the configuration you need. The Jack-Mate comes with a disconnect pin that replaces the cotter pin in the baseplate. It has uses on both ends of a Hi-Lift so the pins simplify assembling the jack in the configuration you need.
With the Jack-Mate flipped upside down, we were able to use it as a tire machine to pop off a bead. We were a little worried about punching a hole in our tire, so we feel the factory flat baseplate is better suited for this duty. With the Jack-Mate flipped upside down, we were able to use it as a tire machine to pop off a bead. We were a little worried about punching a hole in our tire, so we feel the factory flat baseplate is better suited for this duty.
The attachment has provisions for 3/8-inch chain and a hole for a 1-inch D-ring. Both have a multitude of uses. The attachment has provisions for 3/8-inch chain and a hole for a 1-inch D-ring. Both have a multitude of uses.
If you don’t have a winch, the Jack-Mate turns your jack into a 7,000-pound wincher in no time flat. If you don’t have a winch, the Jack-Mate turns your jack into a 7,000-pound wincher in no time flat.
It also turns your Hi-Lift into a real clamp. The original end is rated at 750 pounds. The Jack-Mate is rated at a hefty 7,000 pounds, the same as the jack. It can be used to hold joints together for welding, straightening bent frames, and more. It also turns your Hi-Lift into a real clamp. The original end is rated at 750 pounds. The Jack-Mate is rated at a hefty 7,000 pounds, the same as the jack. It can be used to hold joints together for welding, straightening bent frames, and more.
A bent tie rod can be easily straightened with the Jack-Mate, a few bolts, and a chain attached to your Hi-Lift. We were able to straighten this 11/2-inch 0.120 wall traction bar. The chain keeps the rod from spinning while straightening. A bent tie rod can be easily straightened with the Jack-Mate, a few bolts, and a chain attached to your Hi-Lift. We were able to straighten this 11/2-inch 0.120 wall traction bar. The chain keeps the rod from spinning while straightening.

Tools are like a driver’s license: You never need them until you get caught without them. One tool that has proved itself extremely useful on the trail is a Hi-Lift Jack. Bottle jacks and OE jacks just don’t cut it in the rough. However, sometimes a Hi-Lift can use a little help. We had a chance to try out a Rescue 42 Jack-Mate and found that our Hi-Lift could become way more useful than we thought just by adding an attachment.

The Jack-Mate is made from ultra-thick material and is spray-arc welded together. If you’re not familiar with this particular weld process, it’s used to assemble tractors and excavation buckets; you get the idea—it’s strong. The Jack-Mate can be used to replace the original baseplate and clamp attachment or be used in addition to these pieces. It comes complete with removable pins for simple assembly. Check out the photos for some of its uses.

Sources

Rescue 42
Chico, CA 95927
888-427-3728
www.rescue42.com

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