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On And Off-Road Lighting Tips And Tricks

Jeep With Driving Lights Front Shot
Cole Quinnell | Writer
Posted May 1, 2012

Taking The Darkness Out Of The Nighttime

Nothing changes your perspective on nighttime wheeling or even just driving down paved roads like a good set of lights. And unless you’re driving a brand new $50,000 4x4, your factory lights suck in comparison to what is available. There are multiple ways to put more light in front of your 4x4, including off-road lights and headlight upgrade kits. But these can range from $40 to over $500, so it pays to know a little bit about the technology before whipping out the platinum credit card.

The Basics
In most vehicle lights, electricity flows through a thin piece of metal called a filament just like the soon-to-be-outlawed (in some areas) incandescent light bulbs in your house. The metal heats up almost to the point of melting, and the resulting glow puts the light in your lights. The reflector in the housing focuses the light in one direction, making it more intense. Headlights are rated in watts, and the most basic way to get a brighter light is install higher watt bulbs. These have larger filaments and sometimes different types of metal that handles higher amperage without melting. However, the filament is held in a gas chamber, and the type of gas affects the light output. Really old sealed beams were incandescent, and they use an inert gas. These lights give off a very warm, yellow glow. The filament starts to decay from the first time it is used, becoming dimmer and dimmer until they finally give up. The two most common gases used today for automotive headlights are halogen and xenon. Halogens produce a primarily white light, and the halogen gas causes a chemical reaction that redeposits separated parts of the filament back on the metal when the light is turned off, extending the life and maintaining the brightness of these lights over their life. Xenon is another gas that can be used in lights that have filaments, producing either a pure white or a blue tint. The color is caused by a different temperature at which the filament glows. Both halogen and xenon bulbs produce brighter light with longer life. To add some confusion, xenon is also often used to describe High Intensity Discharge (HID) lights.

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HID Lights
These lights have been used for decades by pro off-road racers for ultra-bright systems that operate at a moderate amp draw and lower temperature. An HID light doesn’t use a filament at all. Instead of heating a filament to the point of glowing, an HID uses electrodes that do not touch. When the gas in the tube heats up to the point of evaporation, an arc of light connects the electrodes. They use xenon gas in the tube, but don’t confuse a xenon light bulb with an HID. In addition to special bulbs – which some companies call a burner to distinguish them from filament-type bulbs – these systems also require a transformer to increase the voltage and create the arc, as well as a starter which literally starts the arc. While a halogen or xenon light attains its full brightness as soon as you turn it on, an HID has a warm-up period. A knock against HID lights has been the expense, but there have been several affordable off-road lights and headlight conversion kits introduced in the past few years.

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LED Lights
A relatively new technology for forward-facing lights is Light Emitting Diodes (LED). They’ve been popular for trailer and Jeep taillights for a long time, but the concept of using them for headlights or off-road lights is pretty new. In an LED, diodes are mounted on a circuit board, and are electrically charged to create light. They are extremely efficient, producing bright, white light with very low amperage draw. They are the fastest to light, and they also produce practically zero heat. A big advantage for off-roading is that they are nearly impervious to damage from shock and vibration.

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Starting Point
When you’re ready to add more light, the best place to start is your headlights. You use these every day, um, we mean every night, so a step up here will be something you’ll get the most use and satisfaction from. Older headlights are a sealed beam-type; when the bulb goes out you replace the entire headlight. Newer systems are a composite made up of a plastic housing that has the reflector and lens and a replaceable bulb. For either of these types, you can upgrade to halogen or xenon bulbs with higher wattage ratings. You’ll probably want to stick with DOT-compliant bulbs to keep out of trouble with your local law enforcement and other motorists, but that’s up to you. There are plenty of legal choices as well as few off-road only options. As a safety precaution, some late-model vehicle electrical systems, such as that in the ’07-up Jeep Wrangler, sense the amp draw through the factory headlight switch and will shut-down the system if the draw is too high. If you want to go brighter than 60/55-watt bulbs, you’ll need to use a relay kit such as the one from Painless Performance shown in “To Relay or Not To Relay.”

Sources

Rugged Ridge
Suwanee, GA 30024
800-449-6649
www.ruggedridgeoffroad.com
Pro Comp
Compton, CA 90220
866-232-0665
www.procomptires.com
Truck-Lite
Falconer, NY 14733
800-562-5012
www.truck-lite.com
LightForce Performance Lighting
Corona, CA 92879
714-460-4247
www.lightforce.com
ARB USA
Renton, WA 98057
866-293-9078
Vision X Lighting
800-489-9820
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