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Sunpro Fuel Sending Unit Install - Average Joe’s Jeep

Posted in How To: Electrical on January 26, 2015
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So I wanted to start this off with an apology. This month’s Average Joe was supposed to be the second installment of Redneck Luxury. Unfortunately, sometimes life has other plans. After two years, my step dad lost his battle with lung cancer, so now instead you’re getting Average Joe’s Public Service Announcement! Kids don’t smoke—It’ll kill you in a horrendously painful way, and watching you die will devour a part of your family’s soul that they will never get back. Now that we’ve gotten this month’s court-mandated community service out of the way, bring on the fart jokes!

Out of the three or four Jeeps I regularly drive, none of them have a functioning fuel gauge. Normally, not having a fuel gauge is just a minor inconvenience that, over the years, I’ve learned to live without. If you’re carbureted, the worst thing that will happen is you’ll run out of gas and need to walk a few miles with a gas can. When you add fuel injection to the mix, it changes the game. Running a normal fuel-injection pump dry even for a few seconds can kill it, leaving you stranded and looking like an idiot (don’t ask me how I know). Now for your stock Jeep, this isn’t too much of a problem; your tank is already empty so it will be easy-ish to drop, and there’s a good chance your local parts store has your pump sitting on the shelf.

In the case of my ’43 GPW lovingly named Big Orange, I’m running a ’94 CPI (Central Port Injection) 4.3L GM V-6 that requires an insane 55-65 PSI fuel pressure. When you run pressures in that range, it gets increasingly difficult to find a suitable pump, and when I do, it often takes a couple days to get the pump. If you’re running an external pump, well, I think you get the point. With that said, I decided it was a worthwhile investment to get the fuel gauge working. After doing some looking around, I decided to go with the Sunpro universal sending unit (PN CP7591). True, it’s a universal sender, but at half the cost of a true early CJ replacement sending unit and no shipping costs, I figured it was worth a shot.

The first step in installing the Sunpro universal sending unit (PN CP7591) is to measure the depth of the tank. The tank I’m using here is an early CJ replacement tank from R&P 4WD and is 6 inches deep. The first step in installing the Sunpro universal sending unit (PN CP7591) is to measure the depth of the tank. The tank I’m using here is an early CJ replacement tank from R&P 4WD and is 6 inches deep.
According to Sunpro’s instructions, with the tank depth of 6 inches, the float-arm length needs to be adjusted to 3 3⁄8 inches long. According to Sunpro’s instructions, with the tank depth of 6 inches, the float-arm length needs to be adjusted to 3 3⁄8 inches long.
The Sunpro universal fuel sender is designed to be used with tanks as deep as 27 inches, but at a depth of only 6 inches, this tank was at the shallow end of the list. The sender depth only needed to be set at 3 inches instead of the 171⁄2 inches it comes set at. The Sunpro universal fuel sender is designed to be used with tanks as deep as 27 inches, but at a depth of only 6 inches, this tank was at the shallow end of the list. The sender depth only needed to be set at 3 inches instead of the 171⁄2 inches it comes set at.
When installing the sender into this tank, I opted out of the paper gasket that comes in the Sunpro kit. Instead, I used the much nicer cork gasket that R&P 4WD supplied with the tank. When installing the sender into this tank, I opted out of the paper gasket that comes in the Sunpro kit. Instead, I used the much nicer cork gasket that R&P 4WD supplied with the tank.
It’s always a good idea to have your tank grounded, but if you’re running a poly tank, it’s mandatory if you want your spiffy new gauge to work. It’s sort of hard to get plastic to move electricity. It’s always a good idea to have your tank grounded, but if you’re running a poly tank, it’s mandatory if you want your spiffy new gauge to work. It’s sort of hard to get plastic to move electricity.

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