Click for Coverage
  • JP Magazine
  • Dirt Sports + Off-Road
  • 4-Wheel & Off-Road
  • Four Wheeler
Subscribe to the Free
Newsletter

Nuts & Bolts: Chevy Suburban Rear Lift

Posted in How To: Tech Qa on July 25, 2017
Share this
Photographers: Verne SimonsTrenton McGee

’Burban Leaves
I have a 1998 eight-lug Chevy Suburban, and I just installed a 5-inch Superlift suspension on it. The problem is that the lift comes with a 5-inch block. I can’t seem to find any rear lift leaf springs for the Suburbans of the 1990s. Some websites say that some fit and others say no to Suburbans. Is there a place you know of that makes lift springs for a 1998 K2500 Suburban? Or am I better off just doing the ORD shackle flip to get a better style rear lift? My rear springs are getting weak after the age and weight of the beast, so that's why I am interested in new springs. Also, right now it has 33-inch tires on it. Would 35s be safe for the front axle and steering components with light to moderate wheeling?

Joe
Via nuts@4wor.com

Like you, we are not big fans of rear lift blocks. At one time several manufacturers offered replacement leaf springs for your 3/4-ton Suburban, including Superlift (superlift.com) and Skyjacker (skyjacker.com). It appears that they and other companies have discontinued them due to low demand. Regardless, we have always been a fan of the Offroad Design (offroaddesign.com) shackle flip kit because it does several things at the same time. In a nutshell, the shackle flip switches the rear from a tension shackle positioned below the springs to a more traditional compression shackle positioned above the springs. It provides lift while correcting the rear pinion angle, and it keeps the rear spring arch reasonable so that factory ride quality is retained. The shackle flip adds about 4 inches of lift, so you will want to combine it with an add-a-leaf, which should breathe some new life into your old leaf springs. If the old springs are completely shot, or you simply prefer to get new ones, the folks at ORD will be happy to help you.

As for your front axle and steering, it should be able to handle 35s without a whole lot of drama, provided you don’t add any kind of traction device to the front and you go easy with the right foot.

Connect With Us

Newsletter Sign Up

Subscribe to the Magazine

Browse Articles By Vehicle

See Results