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Biggest Little Tire Test

Posted in Product Reviews on August 7, 2013 Comment (0)
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Photographers: Off - Road Staff

Do you ever feel like tire reviews in off-road magazines are always performed with giant tires and rarely in a size that fits your daily driver? Wouldn't it be nice to see some tire testing done in some normal tire sizes for once? We felt that way, too, and that's why this story has been a long time coming. We got a fair amount of testing time in before releasing an all-terrain tire guide to help you buy your next tires for your truck or SUV.

Rounding up 13 different all-terrain tires—all offered in a 31-inch tire size on either a 15- or a 16-inch rim—we dispersed them amongst staff and volunteers who would each drive two or three different sets and give us feedback for the story.

At first, we thought we'd be able to put each tire in a ratings system with numerical value, but we quickly realized that one tester could not give a numerical rating to a tire that we could compare against another tester's numbers on a competing tire when they did not each drive on the same tires. Instead, we asked each reviewer to give us feedback on performance, wear, ride, or anything they wanted to tell us about the tires. From there, we took the two most complete reviews of each tire to add to this story. One thing to note is that these tires were mounted on different wheels, and a different wheel width can change tire dimensions slightly.

Using everything we'd gathered, we were able to compile the biggest little all-terrain tire guide with some candid reviews that we felt were pretty accurate. Unfortunately, some of the tested tires became discontinued during our long-term testing, in which case you'll also spot an updated version of the tire that replaced its predecessor. OR

BFGoodrich
What more needs to be said about the tire that basically invented the term “all-terrain”? First debuting in 1976, BFG's All-Terrain has spanned a lifetime over four decades with only minor tread and compound changes over its production run. Is it a dated tire? Of course it is. But it's also the all-terrain that all other all-terrains are still measured against—the standard. Don't expect to see any major tread changes anytime soon.

Make/model: BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO
Made in: Japan
Size on sidewall: 275/70R16
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2270
Tire hardness: 69 @ 92.5 degrees F
Tread depth: 16/32
# of plies in sidewall: Three-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Three-ply polyester, two-ply steel
Weight of tire: 40.0 pounds
Diameter: 30.6 inches
Width: 10.4 inches
Tread width: 8.4 inches
Size range: 26 inches to 37 inches tall for 14-inch to 22-inch wheels
www.bfgoodrichtires.com

Test vehicle: Chevy Tahoe 1500
Average psi: 33
Driver opinion: While some other all-terrain tires may perform better in certain situations, few do it as well as the BFGs in every terrain. It was the tire I learned to off-road on and it excels in dirt. Wet pavement, dry pavement, and snow, too. I've put many on my daily drivers over the years. But after so much time, I feel like it's time for an update. If BFG could make this tire up so many years ago, what could they design today? I'd like to see better highway performance out of the next version, with maybe a taller tread depth. I'd also want better wear characteristics; I got a lot more miles out of a set of Cepeks recently.

Test vehicle: S-10 truck
Average psi: 32/30
Driver opinion: They let me slide around in the dirt a lot better with more control than some other tires I've used with ribs—you know: the ones with treads done in lines around the tire. Those ribbed type work well on the street, but tires like this BFG are what I prefer. You can't beat it—why would the same tread be around for so long if it wasn't the best? Deep mud seems to be the one thing that stops me on these tires, but I'd buy the Mud-Terrain BFGs if I wanted to hit more mud.

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Cooper
Cooper is not a name well known to younger off-roaders, but the company has more experience and history producing off-road tires than you'd think. Cooper's Discoverer A/T3 is a demonstration of such. It resembles a tire more at home on the highway with a five-rib design that can channel water, but the silica-based tread compound grabs dirt and pulls through hard-pack trails that we've hit. We wouldn't mount these on our Jeep, but they're a good prerunner tire with chip resistance and a long-lasting tread.

Make/model: Cooper Discoverer A/T3
Made in: USA
Size on sidewall: 245/75R16
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2205 pounds
Tire hardness: 69 @ 90.5 degrees F
Tread depth: 16.5/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 39.0 pounds
Diameter: 30.3 inches
Width: 9.6 inches
Tread width: 7.7 inches
Size range: 29 inches to 35 inches tall for 15- to 20-inch wheels
www.coopertire.com

Test vehicle: Dodge Ram 1500
Average psi: 35
Driver opinion: These are stiff-feeling tires that do not have a lot of bite but seem to float and bounce on top of the dirt. They are easy to slide, but I don't feel like I have the control when doing so like I do with a General or BFG. Air pressure does not change the handling/feel (like it should). I have pegged sharp rocks and there is no concern and very little chipping or wear based on my thrashings. After 7,000 miles, they show maybe half the wear that a BFG or General would. It does grab on different freeway surfaces. It feels better on gas mileage than other all-terrains I've tried.

Test vehicle: XJ Cherokee
Average psi: 32
Driver opinion: These are the tires I needed more than the tires I wanted. Not an exciting tread, but I know I shouldn't pick tires because of looks. The Coopers are perfect for what I needed—to get back and forth to home, school, and out to work off a five-mile dirt road. They rolled smoothly and quietly, and the carcass of the tire flexed well and didn't have lumpy spots in it. If I were going to buy tires soon, I'd try Cooper's other version, the S/T Maxx, which is a little more aggressive.

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Dick Cepek F-C II
The F-C II stands for “Fun Country, Version 2” and it is every bit the superior successor to the original Dick Cepek Fun Country radial. But the F-C II is better on the highway, still performs well in the dirt, and lasts longer than other all-terrains, partly due to its tall tread depth. It was the most aggressive all-terrain tire in our lineup, and considered to be a hybrid between an A/T and M/T. But Dick Cepek has already released an eventual replacement for the F-C II, rehashing the Fun Country name. We'll test this new Fun Country as soon as we can.

Make/model: Dick Cepek F-C II
Made in: USA
Size on sidewall: 31x10.50R15
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2270 pounds
Tire hardness: 67 @ 90.0 degrees F
Tread depth: 20/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 41.0 pounds
Diameter: 30.5 inches
Width: 10.7 inches
Tread width: 8.5 inches
Size range: 31 inches to 37 inches tall for 15- to 20-inch wheels
www.dickcepek.com

Test vehicle: GMC Yukon
Average psi: 31
Driver opinion: The F-C II is my favorite all-terrain, for sure. Gas mileage did seem to drop just a bit over my last set of all-terrains, but the tread has also barely worn in more than 15,000 miles. They're great when it's rainy out and work like a mud-terrain when the snow gets deeper. I would've let you know if performance diminished when the tread got shallower, but there is still a ton of tread left on the tire.

Test vehicle: Tacoma
Average psi: 35
Driver opinion: The F-C IIs are the noisiest A/Ts I've had. They had good traction in loose dirt, but they look like more of a mud-terrain to me (probably why they're louder). I don't really like the way they handle on the street—a little too aggressive for my tastes. They're wearing great, though. They still have a ton of tread left on them. I don't go off road that much, so I feel like these are wasted on me. I think the Hankooks might be better for my driving style.

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Falken WildPeak A/T
When Falken released the WildPeak A/T, it came out of nowhere. Falken was not a competing name in the off-road world, but one tough all-terrain tire changed that. Falken went all in pushing this tire when it was released, and it paid off. People started to try it, love it, and spread the word. Soon, WildPeaks popped up everywhere on Jeeps and prerunners alike. The traction on hard-packed dirt, rock, and in rainy conditions made this tire well liked. Frankly, we think it's one of the best tires we've driven on in the rain. But don't even look at mud—this is not a mud truck tire. Not to worry, though: Rumor has it that Falken will have a new mud-terrain tire debuting very soon.

Make/model: Falken WildPeak A/T
Made in: Japan
Size on sidewall: 265/75R16
Load range on tested tire: E
Max load: 3415 pounds
Tire hardness: 64 @ 91.0 degrees F
Tread depth: 13/32
# of plies in sidewall: Three-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Three-ply polyester, Two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 56.5 pounds
Diameter: 31.0 inches
Width: 10.9 inches
Tread width: 8.5 inches
Size range: 30 inches to 37 inches tall for 15- to 24-inch wheels
www.falkentire.com

Test vehicle: Ford Expedition
Average psi: N/A
Driver opinion: Overall, I'm very pleased with the tires. I'm not super aggressive on the road, but I'm still surprised that I never seem to slip a tire no matter how rainy it is. I got into an off-camber side-hilling situation once and couldn't believe how well these tires hold sideways in dirt. Bad tire for mud, though—I got stranded in muddy wet grass once. Great tire in the rain on the highway. They wore more quickly than I would have thought.

Test vehicle: Tacoma
Average psi: 35/30
Driver opinion: I got the Falkens when they were new and only put a few thousand miles on them, but they seemed like they'd last a while. Definitely the quietest tires I've run. I really liked how they worked on my truck. Mine's a 2WD so I didn't get into too much rough stuff, but the WildPeaks did give me more confidence to do things I should not be trying in a 2WD—not sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing.

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General
The General's Grabber A/T2 is simply wonderful in the dirt. While it's not nearly as flashy as its brethren race tire, the more subtle Grabber A/T2 tread still seems to inspire a “love it” or “leave it” opinion on tread design. Whether you like it or could leave it, any person to try out this tire will tell you that it is a shock and a half as to how far it will take you off road. It was hard to wrangle this one back from a couple testers, in fact. Initial wear seemed minimal the first time we tried them, and it pushes through mud better than many of its fellow all-terrains. If we had to name a winner in this giant tire review based on feedback, the General Grabber A/T2 might have been it.

Make/model: General Grabber A/T2
Made in: USA/Mexico
Size on sidewall: 265/75R16
Load range on tested tire: E
Max load: 3085 pounds
Tire hardness: N/A
Tread depth: 16/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel, two-ply polyamide
Weight of tire: 51.1 pounds
Diameter: 31.3 inches
Width: 10.6 inches
Tread width: 8.6 inches
Size range: 27 inches to 35 inches tall for 14- to 20-inch wheels
www.generaltire.com

Test vehicle: Second Gen Tacoma
Average psi: 35/30
Driver opinion: The General Grabbers are my favorite all-terrains I've ever tried. They wore really well and evenly. I was not the first tester, but I was the last on these tires and I've gotten more than 50,000 miles out of a used set of tires and still have about 20 percent of the tread left. I have done a lot of freeway driving on these, and they were quiet when I got them, but they have definitely gotten louder. Off road, they still work better than any other all-terrain I tried.

Test vehicle: Dodge Ram 1500
Average psi: 35
Driver opinion: The General Grabber AT2s are some of the best off-road tires I have ever used, and I've tried my fair share. They get excellent marks for road comfort and noise—the usual downfall of a tire that works in the dirt. Road traction was great, too. In the dirt, the tires have an amazing amount of bite and hook-up in relation to the way that they so predictably control slides and hard braking. On washboards, they tracked straight and didn't bounce around. I did get some chunks out of a few knobbies and the softer compound might not hold up like some harder ones. On the road, they do let you feel the freeway bumps a bit.

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Goodyear
The DuraTrac is one of the newest Goodyear tires to join the Wrangler line of tires for light trucks and SUVs. It's also one of the most aggressive all-terrains we've ever tried out, more closely resembling a mud-terrain than a highway-friendly all-terrain. But the DuraTracs are just that—a highway-friendly tire that seems to work well on heavy Super Duty trucks and Jeeps alike. While the more aggressive 4x4s often look to the Wrangler MT/R for a good lightweight off-road tire, the DuraTrac can serve that purpose, too, and be a better daily driver than its mud-terrain counterpart. They also accept studs.

Make/model: Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac
Made in: USA
Size on sidewall: 31x10.50R15
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2270 pounds
Tire hardness: N/A
Tread depth: 18/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel
Weight of tire: N/A
Diameter: 30.8 inches
Width: 10.6 inches
Tread width: 8.4 inches
Size range: 31 inches to 36 inches tall for 15- to 20-inch wheels
www.goodyear.com

Test vehicle: Wagoneer
Average psi: 40
Driver opinion: I did not really like these tires as much as I thought I would. The DuraTracs worked well off road, but it didn't feel very good on the street compared to some others. They were noisy and not really comfortable at high speeds. I liked the Hankook tires I tried out a lot better for highway. The DuraTracs probably had the best off-road traction of any all-terrain tire I've tried, though.

Test vehicle: TJ Wrangler
Average psi: 30
Driver opinion: This is one of the best looking tires and best working tires I've ever used. They are a little noisy. They have worn a little more quickly than other all-terrains, probably because of their soft compound. Would I buy these tires? Yes, without question. They get good traction in loose dirt, snow, and in mud, too—better than a lot of mud-terrains I've tried, actually.

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Hankook
Hankook has a number of DynaPro models for light trucks and SUVs, but there are two we're mainly concerned with: the DynaPro MT and the DynaPro AT-M. We've spent time with the mud-terrain and liked it, but this is the first time any of the staff has tried the AT-M. We can agree that the AT-M is the all-terrain we'd choose for high mileage with light off-road duties. If we had to have an opinion, we'd say that Hankook was more concerned with mileage and wet pavement traction than with winning the Baja 1000 when designing the AT-M. What do you want out of your daily-driven tire?

Make/model: Hankook DynaPro AT-M
Made in: China
Size on sidewall: 31x10.50R15
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2270 pounds
Tire hardness: 64 @91.5 degrees F
Tread depth: 16.5/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 45.5 pounds
Diameter: 30.3 inches
Width: 10.6 inches
Tread width: 8.3 inches
Size range: 29 to 36 inches tall for 15- to 22-inch wheels
www.hankooktireusa.com

Test vehicle: Tacoma
Average psi: 40
Driver opinion: I spent a lot of my time on the street with this AT-M and was off road infrequently. When I was off road, I didn't need 4WD where I did with my old Yokohamas on the same trails. It slipped a little bit more than I thought it would in the rain but was really good on dry pavement. They are the quietest tires I've run. For me, I want the quietest, best street-driving A/T I can get, so this may be the one I buy next time, too.

Test vehicle: Wagoneer
Average psi: 40
Driver opinion: I really like these because they worked so well off road. I thought they were going to be terrible, judging by how smooth they were. But the tread seems deep for the type of tire it is, so maybe that helped it. The DynaPros didn't seem to roll side to side when cornering—like they had a stiff sidewall and felt like they gripped more sharply when cornering in the dirt.

View Slideshow

Hercules
These tires were one of the biggest surprises to both OFF-ROAD staff and volunteers. The Hercules Terra Trac A/T is not exactly a well-known tire, but we had high hopes after previously testing a then-unknown (to us) Hercules M/T that performed excellently in rough off-road terrain. It's the M/T's less-aggressive counterpart, the Terra Trac A/T, that has us excited this time. The tire is performing very similar to some of its more expensive competition, like the Toyos, Nittos, and Hankooks, while selling for less than $200 each.

Make/model: Hercules Terra Trac A/T
Made in: USA
Size on sidewall: 265/70R16
Load range on tested tire: Standard
Max load: 2469 pounds
Tire hardness: 64 @ 89.5 degrees F
Tread depth: 14/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 38.5 pounds
Diameter: 30.3 inches
Width: 10.7 inches
Tread width:8.7 inches
Size range: 28 inches to 34 inches tall for 15- to 20-inch wheels
www.herculestire.com

Test vehicle: Tahoe
Average psi: 35
Driver opinion: What little badasses these Terra Tracs are! Definitely the tire I'm buying next. I looked them up online while I had them on my truck, and they're a lot cheaper than the A/Ts I normally buy. They work good, too. No road noise that I could hear, and they got good traction. I went up this bad shale road once in 4WD and barely made a mark on the tires, and I've chewed up an entire set of tires on this same road once before. I was totally surprised by this tire I've never heard of.

Test vehicle: Suburban
Average psi: 33/33
Driver opinion: Where did this tire come from and why am I only learning about it now? I had no clue what I was getting, but they looked like pretty good rollers right from the get go. When I tried them on my truck, they felt like the Toyos or the Nittos (which I like a lot). I think I like my old BFGs better in the snow, but I like the Terra Trac better for normal highway driving.

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Maxxis
While Maxxis has some of the most aggressive off-road tires ever made, the AT-771 Bravo is not one of them. This is a tire that was meant for the SUV owner who doubles his vehicle's duties between office commuting and weekend play, with more of an emphasis on street ride, wear, and noise. This makes it a great long-lasting choice.

Make/model: Maxxis AT-771 Bravo Series
Made in: Thailand
Size on sidewall: 31x10.50R15
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2270 pounds
Tire hardness: N/A
Tread depth: 16/32
# of plies in sidewall: Three-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Three-ply polyester, two-ply steel, two-ply nylon
Weight of tire: N/A
Diameter: 30.5 inches
Width: 10.5 inches
Tread width: 8.6 inches
Size range: 26 inches to 35 inches tall for 15- to 18-inch wheels
www.maxxis.com

Test vehicle: Frontier
Average psi: 32
Driver opinion: The AT-771 is a tire that will get you through most terrain you aim it at, but get ready to do some pushing if you get into one of those rare circumstances where you'd rather have a bias-ply knobby tire instead of a smooth roller. But I like the AT-771 just driving around town and on freeways—where I used my truck the most. The tires aren't loud at all, even after putting 10,000 miles on them, and they give my truck more of a sports car feel on the street (sorry, I know that sounds lame).

Test vehicle: XJ Cherokee
Average psi: 35
Driver opinion: When the road got muddy, I could still get through in four-wheel drive. Worked in rain perfectly, has worn evenly; like the low road noise. It's also smoother than other A/Ts I've had.

View Slideshow

Mickey Thompson
Mickey Thompson's ATZ debuted less than a decade ago as a more aggressive all-terrain, taking place of an older-model A/T that Mickey Thompson phased out. It was offered in two tread variations—one with five ribs, and a more aggressive one with four ribs. We've tried both and can tell you that we like the four-rib versions best, but we know the five-rib tires (like the one tested here) will last longer on the road. While it isn't a strong mud competitor, the tire does exceptionally well on sand and on dry pavement. The original ATZ's time has already come to an end, though, as Mickey has one-upped themselves with the ATZ P3. We've heard the P3 is an improvement in every way, and we'll know soon enough when our test set shows up.

Make/model: Mickey Thompson Baja ATZ
Made in: USA
Size on sidewall: 265/70R16
Load range on tested tire: STD
Max load: 2469 pounds
Tire hardness: 69 @ 86.0 degrees F
Tread depth: 18/32
# of plies in sidewall: three-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: three-ply polyester, two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 37.0 pounds
Diameter: 30.2 inches
Width: 10.8 inches
Tread width: 8.7 inches
Size range (of current ATZ P3): 33 inches tall to 37 inches tall for 16- to 20-inch wheels
www.mickeythomspontires.com

Test vehicle: Chevy 1500 truck
Average psi: 34/32
Driver opinion: Best sand tire ever! I'd probably take these over sand paddles (since paddles don't work on the street), but seriously—they worked like a bald tire works on the sand (which is a good thing in sand!). They were great street tires when I started, but when I got about halfway through the tread, it didn't seem to be as nice on the street anymore. They got louder, too. But I don't care as long as they work so well in sand and terrain like that.

Test vehicle: TJ Wrangler
Average psi: 30
Driver opinion: The ATZs drove OK on the road, but they tracked some when I came to differences in pavement on highways. They like to grab lines for sure. They worked pretty well for an all-terrain, but definitely not the most aggressive in the dirt—I would've rather had something more like the Cepeks, probably. I can't decide if I like the way they look or not.

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Nitto
Nitto's Terra Grappler is the sensible tire for those who can admit to themselves how they're going to use their trucks. They have got to be one of the quietest all-terrains made, too. The Terra Grappler was one of the first tires that gave big-tire truck guys an option for a smooth roller, debuting in sizes like 37s for lifted trucks that towed trailers and didn't want to run mud tires. We've tried numerous sets of these and can say that it is one of the best-balancing tires we've ever tried with an almost perfect carcass on every tire we've tried. They are heavy, though! It's one of our first choices for any lifted street-legal truck that does a lot of towing.

Make/model: Nitto Terra Grappler
Size on sidewall: 265/70R16
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2469 pounds
Tire hardness: N/A
Tread depth: 13/32
# of plies in sidewall: Three-ply
# of plies in tread: Six-ply
Weight of tire: N/A
Diameter: 30.4 inches
Width: 10.5 inches
Tread width: 8.6 inches
Size range: 31 inches to 37 inches tall for 16- to 24-inch wheels
www.nittotire.com

Test vehicle: Suburban
Average psi: 34
Driver opinion: The Terra Grappler works so well for a tire I have to drive on every day. I never got to wear them out, but I did put a few thousand miles on them and really liked how stiff the sidewalls felt (I drive a big truck that tends to sway if the tires are soft). The Terra Grapplers worked great on dirt and dry rocks, but they didn't work worth a darn when it got muddy out—probably due to the fact they're pretty shallow (tread-wise). The Nittos did not work as well on icy roads as I would have thought. Super tough carcass, though! I can't believe that these have held together, what with all the sharp rocks I've nailed with these tires.

Test vehicle: Ram 1500 4x4
Average psi: 36
Driver opinion: What a boring tread. It's like a stock SUV tire that is made in sizes for big trucks, too. Now that I'm done razzing, I'll say that I was surprised at how well they worked off road when new. When the tread wore in about halfway, they didn't do nearly as well, but they didn't get louder, either. They always worked well on the street, but I expected good street performance just by looking at them. I was more scrutinizing with the off-road performance, which I'd give a 6 out of 10.

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Pro Comp
We can't think of anything the Xtreme A/T does badly. It handles mud better than we ever imagined, and icy roads, too. In fact, we've tried this tire in a variety of sizes on different trucks, and we couldn't be more pleased with how a tire with such large tread lugs and minimal siping does in rain and on snowy roads. There is ample spacing between the tread voids, and at a glance you might mistake this tire for a mud-terrain. But Pro Comp's Xtreme A/Ts will go the distance, literally. Mileage reports on these all-terrains are excellent, probably due in part to the rubber compound used on the tire.

Make/model: Pro Comp Xtreme A/T
Size on sidewall: 31x10.50R15
Load range on tested tire: C
Max load: 2,270 pounds
Tire hardness: 64 @ 90.0 degrees F
Tread depth: 18/32
# of plies in sidewall: Three-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Three-ply polyester, two-ply steel, two-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 47.4 pounds
Diameter: 30.6 inches
Width: 10.5 inches
Tread width: 8.4 inches
Size range: 31 inches to 27 inches tall for 15- to 20-inch wheels
www.procompusa.com

Test vehicle: Ford F-150
Average psi: 33/30
Driver opinion: I cannot say enough about how much I like these tires. They're actually a little louder than I'd like, but I just turn the radio up a little more. I've had these tires everywhere—sand, snow, mud, dirt, rainy street—you name it and my truck has been there. It's like I have chains on for icy highways, and it works better than some mud-terrains I've tried in the mud. My fuel economy decreased a little, though, over my last tires, but I don't drive that much so no biggie.

Test vehicle: Jeep CJ-7
Average psi: 30
Driver opinion: It feels like a mud-terrain! Sorta drives like one, too. My Jeep is pretty light and I try to usually use a light tire on it, but these were sorta heavy and I noticed when accelerating. The traction was pretty good, but it felt that the tire was sitting on top too much and not digging in like I wanted. It's been pretty good on the street, but I don't know about wet streets because I don't drive me CJ (no top) when it rains.

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Toyo
Toyo's Open Country A/T was never a very exciting tire to look at, but the performance and quality of the tire could never be argued. Well known as a great tire for tow vehicles and soccer-mom SUVs, the Open Country A/T is a tire that rolls smoothly and without noise, even when halfway through the tread. Don't be looking for any deep mud performance here, but it does do well in mild off-road terrain—in other words, in any terrain you'd take a 31-inch-tired SUV into. It's too late to buy these tires, though, as Toyo has already come out with a clear improvement in the Open Country A/T II.

Make/model: Toyo Open Country A/T
Made in: Japan
Size on sidewall: 265/70R16
Load range on tested tire: Standard
Max load: 2403 pounds
Tire hardness: 67 @ 90.5 degrees F
Tread depth: 13/32
# of plies in sidewall: Two-ply polyester
# of plies in tread: Two-ply polyester, Two-ply steel, one-ply nylon
Weight of tire: 39.5 pounds
Diameter: 30.4 inches
Width: 10.5 inches
Tread width: 8.5 inches
Size range: 28 inches to 35 inches tall for 15- to 22-inch wheels
www.toyotires.com

Test vehicle: Tacoma
Average psi: N/A
Driver opinion: This tire rode well and I sort of forgot about it. I guess that's a good thing because I would have noticed if it was made poorly or bouncing all over the road. It doesn't do much tracking, and they worked in rain/ice better than the factory tires. The Open Country is likely the next tire I'll put on my Duramax truck, but I probably wouldn't put it on my Tacoma again since I'm using it for more off-road and less street driving these days.

Test vehicle: Wagoneer
Average psi: 40
Driver opinion: It didn't feel like a big enough tire for the Waggy. I know everyone talks these tires up, but I really just didn't feel comfortable on them—maybe it was that this tire was a little small on my truck. The truck wandered too much on the highway. They worked OK in the dirt and felt good at higher speeds in the dirt, but I think I'd want something more aggressive next time.

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