Click for Coverage
  • JP Magazine
  • Dirt Sports + Off-Road
  • 4-Wheel & Off-Road
  • Four Wheeler
Subscribe to the Free
Newsletter

Jeep JK Hood Lock Install

Posted in Product Reviews on May 30, 2015
Share this

Security on a Jeep Wrangler has always been a bit of a lark. Cloth tops, zippered windows, and exterior hood latches do not make for the most theft-proof vehicles. While a hardtop and full doors can help secure the interior, the engine compartment is left open to anyone with opposable thumbs. Strattec Security Corporation has come out with a solution to that particular problem: the Breakthrough One-key Lock Technology line-up. Since all of their locks use your factory ignition key, there’s no more carrying around a 5-pound key ring. The newest addition to the line-up is a bolt-in hood lock for the Jeep Wrangler JK. It’s a very simple installation, requiring nothing more than a small flat-head screwdriver, a rivet gun, and an hour or so of your time.

Hood locks have been around for some time and can be a good investment. Aside from securing the hood, they can also help with that annoying hood flutter some Jeeps have by pulling the hood latch down tighter to the grill. Our ’11 Jeep Wrangler JK has the Daystar Hood Wranglers. Being much tighter than the stock hood hold-downs, flutter wasn’t an issue. If your hood does flutter, one possible solution would be to add a couple of thin washers under the hood lock to raise it up a hair. This would let the hood latch sit tight against it and give something solid for the hold-downs to pull against. When using this method, double check that the mounting holes all line up and re-drill if necessary. A small-diameter round-file can also be used to fine-tune the hole alignment.

Use a small flat-head screwdriver to pry up the plastic clips holding the grill on. Don’t worry too much about breaking the clips—new ones are included with the hood lock. We found that it wasn’t necessary to remove the entire grill. Letting it lean forward against our winch control box worked just fine to keep it out of the way. Use a small flat-head screwdriver to pry up the plastic clips holding the grill on. Don’t worry too much about breaking the clips—new ones are included with the hood lock. We found that it wasn’t necessary to remove the entire grill. Letting it lean forward against our winch control box worked just fine to keep it out of the way.
Once it’s installed, the hood lock is barely noticeable. Keep in mind that if you have grill inserts, you will need to trim the top of it to allow access to the keyhole. A hacksaw and hand file did the trick on ours. Once it’s installed, the hood lock is barely noticeable. Keep in mind that if you have grill inserts, you will need to trim the top of it to allow access to the keyhole. A hacksaw and hand file did the trick on ours.
A few other nifty products in the Bolt line-up, include a trailer lock, hitch-pin lock, padlock, and cable lock. From your spare tire to your off-road trailer, just about everything you need to secure is covered by these locks. A few other nifty products in the Bolt line-up, include a trailer lock, hitch-pin lock, padlock, and cable lock. From your spare tire to your off-road trailer, just about everything you need to secure is covered by these locks.

Sources

Daystar
Phoenix, AZ 85043
800-595-7659
www.daystarweb.com
Strattec Security
Milwaukee, WI 53209
414-247-3333
www.boltlock.com

Connect With Us

Newsletter Sign Up

Subscribe to the Magazine

Browse Articles By Vehicle

See Results