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Project Teal Brute - 1997 Jeep Wrangler Master Pull Superline XD Synthetic Winch Line

Posted in Project Vehicles on March 1, 2010 Comment (0)
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Keeping with our tradition of making improvements to enhance our Brute's ability to handle every off-pavement scenario possible, we decided to swap out the heavy steel cable that came with our rear-mounted 12,500-pound T-Max winch in favor of Superline XD synthetic winch line from Master Pull.

With steel cable mounted up front and synthetic winch line out back, our beloved Teal Brute is armed for virtually any extraction scenario.

Our logic was pretty simple: Why have steel cable at each end of the vehicle when some recovery scenarios call for synthetic winch line? Sure, steel cable will typically outlast rope in highly abrasive environments such as lava rock or shale-but other times, such as those where a large crowd of onlookers surrounds you, or where the risk of electrical shock may be present (fallen trees or power poles), synthetic winch line is the obvious choice. Consider this, too: synthetic winch line is easy on your hands. If it gets chafed or becomes worn due to use, you won't have to worry about those little sharp burrs or kinks that make thick leather gloves a necessity when handling steel winch cable.

Synthetic winch line also saves weight. We checked the scales, and the synthetic cable weighed 81 percent less than the steel cable we removed. Pound for pound, synthetic winch line also beats steel cable in terms of strength-to-weight ratio. Master Pull informed us that the 3/8-inch steel cable we removed from our winch was rated, optimistically, at 14,400 pounds. By contrast, the 5/16-inch synthetic winch line we installed is rated at 21,000 pounds.

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Sources

Master Pull
Bellingham, WA 98226
877-797-0202
http://www.masterpull.com

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