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Week to Wheeling Day 4

Posted in Project Vehicles on December 13, 2018
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Photographers: Anthony Soos

You know that holiday dinner that looks so good so you absolutely heap your plate and excitedly head to the table, only to discover 12 pounds of meat takes a whole lot more chewing than you initially thought? You still enjoy every mouthful, but you’re at the table a bit longer than you first anticipated. That was Day 4 for the Week to Wheeling build crew of Jason Scudellari, Christian Arriero, and Christian Hazel. The day started off with Jason expertly building some brake lines to accommodate the rear G2 disc-brake Dana 44 rear since the hard lines from the original drum brakes weren’t gonna cut it. Hazel installed the E-brake cables, shocks, and front suspension components while Arriero worked on wiring in the Eaton E-Lockers and making a clean two-way light switch and the locker rockers work in the factory TJ dash pod.

With the front suspension and steering parts all plunked in where they belong we installed the EBC Extra Duty 9000 pads and 3GD Series dimpled and slotted rotors and then tossed the factory rolling stock on so we could lower the Jeep onto its own weight to measure for the new rear driveshaft and adjust the rear pinion angle, front caster, set the steering toe measurement, and center the steering wheel. We got lucky and nailed the front track bar length on the first try, but we’ll have to adjust the rear track bar to center the diff under the tub.

Finally, with the driveshaft measurement off to the local builder we pulled off the chalky factory fender flares and assembled the Bushwacker Flat Fender Flares using all the included hardware. The Bushwacker flares use a separate bracket system that bolts to the existing flare holes. There’s no drilling or modification necessary. Just remove the stock flares, bolt the Bushwacker brackets in place using the supplied stainless steel hardware, and then slide the front and rear flat flares over and secure with the supplied screws. Once we had the old parts off the Bushwacker flares was one of the easier parts of this build.

We’ll be back early tomorrow morning to hit it hard, starting by bleeding the brakes, filling the axles with gear lube, and then hopefully installing the new rear driveshaft as soon as it’s done at the driveline shop. Once that’s installed we’ll set the pinion angle to be in line with the rear driveshaft angle, adjust the rear track bar, and then install the ProCar by Scat seats while the new Kenda Klever R/T KR601 tires in 35x12.50R17 size are mounted and balanced on the 17x8.5 Method wheels we selected for this vehicle. Then hopefully before sundown we’re ready for some wheeling. Tune in to fourwheeler.com to check our progress!

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