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"I've Been Wheeling Since I Was Born."

Posted in Project Vehicles on December 1, 1999
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Photographers: Nancy Baily
190large+1966 ford bronco+front under view
<b>A custom crossover bar and boxed radius arms strengthen the frontend.<b> A custom crossover bar and boxed radius arms strengthen the frontend.
<b>Coil springs   welded to the mount and 8-inch hydraulic rams increase frontend travel.<b> Coil springs welded to the mount and 8-inch hydraulic rams increase frontend travel.
<b>Custom leaf springs are bolted to 18-inch-long cylinders that act as shackles.<b> Custom leaf springs are bolted to 18-inch-long cylinders that act as shackles.
195large+1966 ford bronco+side view

When asked what got him into four-wheeling, Jason Paule said, I've been wheelin since I was born. Take one look at his 66 Bronco and you'll see what he means. He built this rig for hard-core action, and in his words, It's a very purpose-built machine. A hands-on kind of guy, Jason owns a custom air-brushing and 4x4 modification shop offering plenty of ideas for more Paulebuilt projects.

For reliability, JP decided to leave the Ford six-cylinder 200ci engine stock with the exception of split custom headers and dual exhaust, which enable the small-block to breathe a bit better. Power is sent through the NP435 tranny to a Model 20 transfer case. From there, the ponies are split to the 4.88:1-geared Dana 44 front-end and the rear Dana 44 Scout axle, which is also treated with 4.88:1 gears. Fifteen-inch aluminum Jackmans with 33-inch SuperSwampers help with the giddy-up, and the brakes, like the motor, are of average pony stock.

On the other hand, the homebuilt suspension system on this horse gets a little crazy. With two stock coils welded together on each side, the front suspension is a homemade extravaganza. Custom shock loops hold mounts for 8-inch hydraulic rams and adjustable shock-length mounts. There are four Monroe shocks with ball-joint ends, one at each corner. In addition, a crossover bar was implemented to strengthen the loops as well as the radius arms, which are boxed and rotated back six degrees.

The back end of this Bronc has stock springs with extra leaves that control the bucking action, along with a triangle link that uses a trailer hitch/ball setup and helps keep the rear end centered. Instead of U-bolts, it uses handcrafted pivot plates. The leaf springs are bolted to 18-inch-long cylinders acting as shackles. The Monroe shocks are mounted at an angle allowing for increased travel. Each cylinder then can be controlled individually or adjusted in pairs or all at once. Jason mounted control valves between the seats for easy adjustment and used steel brake lines to carry the fluid to the cylinders.

The body was hacked, chopped, and bobbed every way imaginable, creating quite an interesting-looking beast. One of the coolest things about this rig is the meticulous metalwork coated with its blinding bright-orange spray job. Some of the body modifications include a chopped top, a homebuilt tailgate with a flip-up license plate, shaved mirrors and smoothed taillights, diamond-plated lower body panels, a custom enlarged floorpan, and an aluminum dashboard. It also sports a six-point rollcage with removable rear bars. The front bumper was handmade out of 4x2 tubing and comes with a winch mount that receives a Warn XD8000.

Jason always arrives at the trail prepared for any situation and carries extra chain straps, a shovel, a hydraulic axle jack, a high-lift, extra fuel, and many extra parts for quick trail fixes. The interior is equipped with Honda bucket seats, a Grant GT steering wheel, and a Realistic CB radio.

The Paulebuilt is an impressive vehicle from any standpoint, and we hope to see more healthy stock coming from Jason's stable.

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