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2014 Toyota Tundra And 4Runner

Posted in Vehicle Reviews on January 6, 2014 Comment (0)
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When something's already good, there's no need to re-invent it. That's the theme behind the mid-cycle refreshing bestowed on the 2014 Toyota Tundra and 4Runner.

The Tundra reached bona fide fullsize status with the 2007 model, and that continues in 2014. Toyota's research indicates three key buyers make up the bulk of the Tundra purchasers: family guys, "active boomers," and skilled workers. Toyota offers the Tundra in three cab configurations and three different engine packages. Toyota assembles the Tundra and the Tacoma in its San Antonio, Texas, plant, noting that the plant employs many military veterans. The MSRP range for the Tundra starts at just over $25K and tops out at just under $48K. Options and engine packages, of course, determine the MSRP of each combination. Three terms Toyota used to describe the Tundra are "active," "upscale," and "rustic." Those who tow with their Tundras will be pleased to know the Tundra is the one and only half-ton pickup that is fully compliant with SAE J2807 standards. For 2014, the Tundra received, among other upgrades, a new front-end treatment featuring a bolder, more aggressive look.

We got to ride in a 2014 Trail model 4Runner, but we wish Toyota would have had enough 4Runners on hand to allow us to take a turn at the wheel. Even so, we got to experience 4Runner’s electronic crawl control, which maintains forward momentum even when a tire lifts off the ground. For positive, locked-up traction, there’s an electronic locking rear differential available at the touch of a button. The Trail model’s new front-end treatment is attractive and aggressive, but we anticipate many enthusiasts will want to modify the front end to accommodate a winch or winch bumper.

The 4Runner's mantra is, "Keep it wild." Rugged body-on-frame construction thankfully continues with the 4Runner, and Toyota buyers who'd rather have a lighter-duty SUV can go for the unibody RAV4 or the Highlander. Toyota notes over 75 percent of all 4Runners ever made are still on the road, an impressive statistic considering the 4Runner came to life in 1984. Three option packages are available: SR5 (basic, but still well-appointed), Limited (luxury), and Trail (maximum off-road capability). Each 2014 4Runner is powered by Toyota's proven 270-horsepower 4.0 V-6 that features variable valve timing (VVT-i) on both the intake and exhaust sides. A roof rack comes standard on all 4Runner models. Four-wheel drive 4Runner models come with a two-speed transfer case; low range is a respectable, versatile 2.56:1. In addition to new front-end styles, the 2014 4Runner received interior upgrades, audio system upgrades (integrated SiriusXM radio, for one), and new iPod and Bluetooth connectivity features.

Throughout the press introduction experience, the Toyota staff emphasized Toyota quality over and over. It's obvious they're serious about building high-quality trucks and SUVs that go the distance, and then some. The Tundra and 4Runner were already good. Now, they're that much better.

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