1. home
  2. features
  3. Welding Tools for on the Trail

Welding Tools for on the Trail

Metal Mending

Fred WilliamsPhotographer, Writer

If you keep wheeling long enough you’ll break stuff, and eventually what you break will require serious metal surgery to get you (or a fellow four-wheeler) off the trail. We love a good challenging trail fix, and a welder is right there among those tools we’d recommend if you can find the space and spare change to fit and afford one. The spectrum of welding options is wide, so we focus here on just those that you can use away from home without a 220-volt power outlet nearby. This is trail welding technology at its best. Or field welding, fixing stuff around the house, or barn welding—pretty much any welding without local power.

The welding we’re discussing revolves around stick welding. Sure, TIG is sexy and MIG is easy, but stick is dirt-simple and tough. And really what we’re after here is simple and tough to get us off the trail and back home. That being said, we’d recommend some stick welding practice at home before you need to fix something in the dirt because welding is like riding a bike on a railroad track: It takes practice, but you’ll impress your friends if you get really good. More important, you’ll be the hero who everyone calls to help fix broken junk when they’re in the dirt, and that pretty much means you get to take whatever you want out of their cooler. That’s the rule.