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1949 Dodge Power Wagon Restomodded With Cummins Power

This 350hp classic is loaded with luxury and ready to hit the trails.

Kelly LinAuthor

When you think of the Dodge Power Wagon, the extremely capable and surprisingly comfortable heavy-duty Ram 2500 pickup likely comes to mind. But the Power Wagon nameplate is hardly new; it was first used after World War II, when Dodge realized there was a civilian market for go-anywhere, heavy-duty trucks. Want to mix some of that new Power Wagon goodness with the cachet of the original? Legacy Classic Trucks is offering restomods of classic Dodge Power Wagons like the one pictured here—but they'll cost you a pretty penny.

This 1949 Dodge Power Wagon looks ready for decidedly non-vintage action with 40-inch Toyo tires clamped to beadlock wheels, Dana 60 axles, ARB locking differentials, and Warn locking hubs. A Warn winch on the front end allows drivers to clear out trails or tow other vehicles. There's just no messing with this beefy truck—it weighs 7,500 pounds and sits on a massive 144-inch wheelbase.

Inside the cabin, you'll find bespoke leather seats, German square-weave carpeted floor mats, a large wood steering wheel, and vintage gauges. The retro elements mix with modern technologies including Bluetooth, USB charging ports, and a new HVAC system. The modern vibes continue under the hood, where you can find a twin-turbo Cummins diesel engine making 350 hp and 600 lb-ft of torque. Legacy Classic Trucks goes straight for our hearts with the five-speed manual transmission, too.

It takes more than 2,000 hours to build each Power Wagon conversion. The essentially new rigs are priced at $350,000—before any upgrades. Legacy Classic Trucks has offered a host of restorations before the Power Wagon, including modern conversions for the Jeep Scrambler and Chevy NAPCO. It also works on custom projects. This 1949 Power Wagon was the company's 108th vehicle, and, given how awesome it is, we doubt it'll be the last.

Photos courtesy of Legacy Classic Trucks